The Biggest Trends at Lagos Fashion Week 2022
Photos By Daniel Amao for OkayAfrica

From knitwear to tassel bags, here are the biggest trends that ruled Lagos Fashion Week 2022.

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As Lagos Fashion Week returned to a normal schedule in 2022, the question amongst retailers, critics, and influencers was: what was going to be the biggest trends?

On the runway, Ejiro Amos Tafiri had a diaphanous collection in silk organza see-throughs, from blouses, tops to skirts and midi dresses. Creative director Samantha Adebayo, of fast-rising Nigerian brand, Gëto, had a male model holding a pinkish-lavender humongous round bag.

Brands like Fruché, Oshobor, Olisa Kenya, Heru Shezi threw some knitted pieces in their collections. While models had breasts peeking from tailored suits and blazers—Nigerian brand FIA did so to recognize breast cancer awareness month—others were engulfed in powerfully voluminous gowns. Pink is back (did it ever leave?) and there were a bunch of beautifully crafted separates on the runway to keep your wardrobe fresh throughout the year.

Whether you are ordering these designers’ pieces right away or waiting for them to hit stores, these are the biggest trends at Lagos Fashion Week to keep in mind.

Get Your Knit On

Newcomer Olisa Kenya sent off a debut collection of exquisite bodycon knit dresses in red and green.

Photo By Daniel Amao for OkayAfrica

Knitwear will always be a wardrobe staple just for its versatility. And even though knits have been around before the start of Lagos Fashion Week, their sight on the runway solidified the reason to have them. The knitted black evening dress from Fruché was a glam statement, as well as the brown off-shoulder knit top worn by a male model. Newcomer Olisa Kenya sent off a debut collection of exquisite bodycon knit dresses in red and green. Same for Heru Shezi, the South African brand that cocooned a model in a giant, floor-sweeping, turtleneck-ribbed dress upcycled with other materials, creating a loose flowy silhouette.

Suit Yourself

Although a menswear brand from Nigeria, creative director of TJWHO, Taju Ibrahim, introduced female models in his LFW runway lineup.

Photo By Daniel Amao for OkayAfrica

Although a menswear brand from Nigeria, creative director of TJWHO, Taju Ibrahim, introduced female models in his LFW runway lineup. One came out in a sharp black suiting and the other in a soft, fleecy, light gray pantsuit with a wrap detail. Elsewhere, Rick Dusi continued the tradition of women in suits, displaying models in gold lame pants and skirt suits that shimmered as if on the way to a disco ball.

Tassel Bags, Everywhere at Once

Tassel bags were a prominent part of Heru Shezi's show.

Photo By Daniel Amao for OkayAfrica

No accessory was as prominent at this year’s Lagos Fashion Week than tassel bags. They first popped up on the Emmy Kasbit runway, with two tassel bags made from aso-oke. Heru Shezi also had a model holding one. South Africa’s Maxhosa presented one as well in their showcase.

But it was Nigerian womenswear label Abiola Olusola that truly stunned: the tassels on the bag were incredibly long that they swept the floor as models walked. Nigerian label Banke Kuku had models strutting with tassel bags in their offsite show.

Pink, Pink, Pink

A pink strapless ruffled dress from Oriré.

Photo By Daniel Amao for OkayAfrica

Pink was one of the dominant color trends at the Lagos Fashion Week runway, and it was in every shade. Like the hot pink loose gowns from Ivorian brand Simone & Elise; halter dress and drop-waist trousers from Kadiju; slit shirting from Jermaine Bleu; layering from South African brand Munkus; matching sets from Senegal’s Algueye Dakar; the strapless ruffled dress from Oriré; and the baby pink tops and skirts from Pepper Row and Ejiro Amos Tafiri.

The color was so omnipresent that it showed up at offsite shows as well: the pleated, clam shell-shaped crop top in fuschia pink from swimwear Nigerian label Andrea Iyamah to bra top at Imad Eduso. If you haven’t already, this is a public service announcement to slot in pink in your wardrobe.

Raffia on the Rocks

Cynthia Abila had a model wearing a multi-hued raffia top over huge green pants.

Photo By Daniel Amao for OkayAfrica

Raffia is this season’s wardrobe darkhorse. Cynthia Abila had a model wearing a multi-hued raffia top over huge green pants. Over at the offsite presentation of Nigerian artisanal brand Eki Kere, raffia was dipped in boiling dye bath to produce colors like fuschia pink and green.

Full Head Masks

Oshobor had a red mask fully covering the head of a model.

Photo By Daniel Amao for OkayAfrica

Whether it’s still the specter of COVID-19 or a desire to be less visible in our world of social media overexposure, head masks had such a strong presence at Lagos Fashion Week. Bleeding from this year’s street style, we could see heads covered in breathable polyester masks or some stylized head-wearing gear.

On the runway, Nigerian menswear brand Ugo Monye sent out most models in a gray cotton head masks. Oshobor did the same with their first look, a red mask fully covering the head of a model. Does your wardrobe need a full head mask? The decision is entirely yours.

Cutouts

Jermaine Bleu had a straight gown with a slit, with a knot detail at the neck and side cutouts.

Photo By Daniel Amao for OkayAfrica

Cutouts were dominant at Lagos Fashion Week. This included side cutouts in the adire swimsuit from Cute Saint Lagos and front one in the their navy blue strapless jumpsuit. Side cutouts showed up in Olooh’s shirred, seashell-pink gown straight gown and a simple but gorgeous plunge-necked dress with asymmetrical hem. Jermaine Bleu had a straight gown with a slit, with a knot detail at the neck and side cutouts.

Deconstruction, Baby

Every wardrobe should have at least two deconstructed pieces.

Photo By Daniel Amao for OkayAfrica

Every wardrobe should have at least two deconstructed pieces. This is the agenda we are pushing. For proof, see SVL Design’s denim-hemmed skirt stitched to navy blue blazer from behind, looking like a cape. Nigerian label Abiola Olusola made attempts at deconstructed by slicing a sleeveless black jacket sideways. Ghanian label Metakay had a sleeveless gown deformed out a shape, the new silhouette protruding sideways with frumpy excess fabric. Established Nigerian label Gozel Green showed a matching set of a collared crop top and skirt: sleeves pulled apart from the armhole and stopping at the cuff, with the skirt’s tulip-hemmed tail billowing behind.

Convinced now?

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