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Listen to Vigro Deep’s Highly Anticipated Album ‘Rise Of Baby Boy’

Amapiano producer Vigro Deep releases 19-track album 'Rise of Baby Boy'.

Pretoria's youngest amapiano export, Vigro Deep has released his much-awaited 19-track album Rise of Baby Boy which is the latest offering from his Baby Boy series of albums—he has previously released career defining EP Road to Baby Boy II, followed by Baby Boy 2 Reloaded and Baby Boy III within months of each other in 2019. This latest offering features vocalists Bucie, Rethabile, Khumz, Khama Billiat and Sax.

Read: Vigro Deep and Masterpiece Take Inspiration from a Kwaito Classic in New Amapiano Banger 'Amanumber K'phela'

This a no-skip album that will have you dancing on your toes from beginning to end. "Phumelela", featuring Mhawkeys, is a motivational fire-starter track in response to the pandemic as we navigate lockdown levels and the pressures that come with being cooped up at home.



Keeping with nostalgia of fun times, "Blue Monday" featuring Focalistic stands out, the track samples the South African house classic tune DJ Mujava's "Mogwanti" which put Pretoria's house scene on the map.

Nineteen-year-old Vigro Deep, young as he is, always references the great music that came before him and "Blue Monday" is in part a homage to Pretoria's notorious night scene and music developments over the years. The project contains 19 songs to commemorate Vigro Deep's 19th birthday.

Twitter went mad within hours of the album's release; music enthusiasts and fans tweeted Vigro Deep with crazy gif reactions leading to Rise of Baby trending nationally.



Born and raised in Atteridgeville, Pretoria, Vigro Deep has earned the respect of house music industry veterans like FistasMixwell. He produced hits a year after learning to produce and the popular indie label Kalawa Jazmee added him to its roster.

Listen to Rise of Baby Boy on Spotify and Apple Music.

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Photo by Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Hugh Masekela's New York City Legacy

A look back at the South African legend's time in New York City and his enduring presence in the Big Apple.

In Questlove's magnificent documentary, Summer of Soul, he captures a forgotten part of Black American music history. But in telling the tale of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, the longtime musician and first-time filmmaker also captures a part of lost South African music history too.

Among the line-up of blossoming all-stars who played the Harlem festival, from a 19-year-old Stevie Wonder to a transcendent Mavis Staples, was a young Hugh Masekela. 30 years old at the time, he was riding the wave of success that came from releasing Grazing in the Grass the year before. To watch Masekela in that moment on that stage is to see him at the height of his time in New York City — a firecracker musician who entertained his audiences as much as he educated them about the political situation in his home country of South Africa.

The legacy Masekela sowed in New York City during the 1960s remains in the walls of the venues where he played, and in the dust of those that are no longer standing. It's in the records he made in studios and jazz clubs, and on the Manhattan streets where he once posed with a giant stuffed zebra for an album cover. It's a legacy that still lives on in tangible form, too, in the Hugh Masekela Heritage Scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music.

The school is the place where Masekela received his education and met some of the people that would go on to be life-long bandmates and friends, from Larry Willis (who, as the story goes, Masekela convinced to give up opera for piano) to Morris Goldberg, Herbie Hancock and Stewart Levine, "his brother and musical compadre," as Mabusha Masekela, Bra Hugh's nephew says.

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