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Image courtesy of Miss South Africa

Shudufhadzo Musida is crowned Miss South Africa at Table Bay Hotel in Cape Town

Newly Crowned Miss South Africa Shudufhadzo Musida is South Africa's Reigning Bold Beauty

South Africa has crowned new Miss South Africa, Shudufhadzo Musida, and she is challenging beauty standards as well as mental health stigma.

South Africa has unveiled new Miss South Africa, Shudufhadzo Musida, who was crowned in Cape Town. South Africa is not one to stope cultural festivities, and held the annual Miss South Africa this past Saturday at Table Bay Hotel in the midst of a global pandemic. Musida's win comes as no surprise as she was voted "fan favourite" from the top 10 contestants announced last year in August. The 24-year-old has already taken to the road with radio interviews and is Miss South Africa's first crowned bald beauty.


Limpopo-born Musida expressed in an interview with Afternoon Express how she had to endure being bullied for being Venda in a country that favours Nguni culture and languages. Venda people are often marginalised because they represent a minority with a culture and language that is vastly different from popular Nguni cultures such as Zulu and Xhosa. Musida said that she will campaign for mental health and women empowerment. The newly crowned queen stated that less than 10 percent of South Africans have access to mental health services. Musida said her reign aims to fight the stigma that is attached with finding help for mental illnesses.

"If the mind is conquered, we'll go nowhere," Musida expressed in a media press briefing.

Tall and voluptuous, Musida started modelling from the age of 17 and has previously worked with international companies Eucerin and Woolworths. She has also featured in Vogue Italia's catalogue shoots. While Miss South Africa has an extensive modelling portfolio, it is current Miss Universe Zozibini Tunzi who inspired Musida to enter Miss South Africa. Tunzi's beautiful dark skin and edgy haircut broke history by being the first Black Miss South Africa to win without hair extensions. Musida took it a step further by going completely bald.

The bald look is one favoured by both sexes in South Africa and is affectionately known as chiskop. Black South Africans are known for being militant about challenging Eurocentric beauty standards. It is South African's Black beauty advocacy that saw an insensitive hair advert targeted at Black people pulled out due to public backlash. The infamous TRESemme hair advert described Black African hair as "damaged" and "dry" whilst Caucasian hair was described as "fine" and "normal". Tunzi took to her public platform to slam the company and local beauty store Clicks for running the ad which had evident racist undertones.

Musida is currently studying towards an honours degree in International Relations from the University of Witwatersrand. Congratulations have been pouring in from prominent South Africans and followers of Musida's journey. She takes over the reins from Miss South Africa 2019 Sasha-Lee Olivier. The first and second runners-up are Tato Moselle and Natasha Joubert.







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It's Official: British Vogue Has Made 2022 The Year of the African Model

The major fashion magazine's February 2022 issue features 9 gloriously Black and African models - and we can't get enough.

Sigh... The Black Woman.

Legendary fashion and lifestyle magazine British Vogue has set the tone and welcomed in a new era with their latest cover, celebrating Black women in all of their glory. In what is arguably their most diverse, Afro-centric issue to date, the February 2022 issue of the popular magazine features 9 glorious (and Black) African models. Their latest issue, which celebrates "The Rise of The African Model", features South Sudanese models Adut Akech, Akon Changkou, and Anok Yai, Ethiopian beauty Akway Amar, Senegalese-Italian Dibaa Maty, Nigeria's Jumbo Janet, Nyaguaa from Sierre Leone, Australian Abény Nhial, and American model Majesty Amare.

Photographer Rafael Pavarotti captured the group's beauty, and British Vogue editor-in-chief Edward Enninful's vision beautifully. On the cover, Enninful says, "I saw all these incredible models from across Africa who were just so vivacious and smart. These girls are redefining what it is to be a fashion model. He went on to speak about the soon-to-be-historic cover on his Instagram, writing, "No longer just one or two dark-skinned girls mingled backstage, but a host of top models took a meaningful, substantial and equal place among the most successful women working in fashion today. It means so much to me to see it."

Echoing Edward's words and highlighting the importance of having diverse models on both sides - the model and the viewer - model Adut told the fashion magazine, "When I first started modeling internationally... I would literally be the only Black, dark-skinned girl in the show. There were no Sudanese models, no African models," the 22-year-old model said, "Now, I go to a show and there are girls from my country, girls from Africa who look like me. So yes, there has been a huge change. It has gone from me being the only one at a show, to 15 or 20 of us. I'm just so happy that we are finally at this place. I was tired of always feeling out of place, and feeling like an outcast."



Social media lost it when the cover dropped, many sharing the emotional impact seeing so many Black models on an international cover has over them.



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Nigeria's Government Has Lifted Its Twitter Ban

We chat to two Nigerians working in media about the restoration of Twitter across the country.