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Watch Miss Universe 2019, Zozibini Tunzi, on 'The Daily Show with Trevor Noah'

Miss Universe 2019 speaks to Trevor Noah about how she's had to deal with online abuse as well as wanting to raise awareness around gender-based violence and femicide in South Africa.

Last night, the recently crowned Miss Universe Zozibini Tunzi appeared on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah.

It was a South African dream—the boy from Soweto interviewing the girl from Tsolo. A week into her reign, Tunzi sat down with Noah to speak about a number of issues she's encountered thus far, both good and bad.


At the beginning of the interview the two share jokes about how the Miss Universe journey still feels surreal for Tunzi.

Going on to speak about her journey to the Miss Universe pageant, Tunzi describes experiencing some South Africans talking about how she was a "downgrade" from the previous Miss South Africa and made comments especially about her dark skin. "It was late in the evening and I took a photo of my apartment and I was like, it's such a beautiful night and a comment came in saying, 'this photo is so black, it's as black as you are, Miss ugly SA'". She goes on to say that, "I'm not mad because it's just how society has labeled beauty to be. It's just how we've been programmed to look at beauty in that way. The further you are from being fair, the uglier you are."

Watch Zozibini Tunzi's Interview on 'Sway In The Morning'

Tunzi also speaks about the expectations other people had with regards to her hair. After Noah asks her why she didn't consider straightening her hair or wearing a weave, she says, "Because this is my hair. At first people were like 'is this a strategy?' and I'm like 'to what, to wake up and be myself?'"

Both Tunzi and Noah touch on the importance of raising awareness around gender-based violence and femicide in South Africa. "Women are fighting all over the world to be safe again in this world," Tunzi says. "Women are an endangered species these days."

It's an interview that will leave you wishing it was much longer.

Watch the full interview below:

Miss Universe 2019 'Zozibini Tunzi' on The Daily Show With Trevor Noah www.youtube.com

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Photo by Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Hugh Masekela's New York City Legacy

A look back at the South African legend's time in New York City and his enduring presence in the Big Apple.

In Questlove's magnificent documentary, Summer of Soul, he captures a forgotten part of Black American music history. But in telling the tale of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, the longtime musician and first-time filmmaker also captures a part of lost South African music history too.

Among the line-up of blossoming all-stars who played the Harlem festival, from a 19-year-old Stevie Wonder to a transcendent Mavis Staples, was a young Hugh Masekela. 30 years old at the time, he was riding the wave of success that came from releasing Grazing in the Grass the year before. To watch Masekela in that moment on that stage is to see him at the height of his time in New York City — a firecracker musician who entertained his audiences as much as he educated them about the political situation in his home country of South Africa.

The legacy Masekela sowed in New York City during the 1960s remains in the walls of the venues where he played, and in the dust of those that are no longer standing. It's in the records he made in studios and jazz clubs, and on the Manhattan streets where he once posed with a giant stuffed zebra for an album cover. It's a legacy that still lives on in tangible form, too, in the Hugh Masekela Heritage Scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music.

The school is the place where Masekela received his education and met some of the people that would go on to be life-long bandmates and friends, from Larry Willis (who, as the story goes, Masekela convinced to give up opera for piano) to Morris Goldberg, Herbie Hancock and Stewart Levine, "his brother and musical compadre," as Mabusha Masekela, Bra Hugh's nephew says.

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