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Video: Niniola Talks Afro-House and Getting Co-Signs From Timbaland & Drake

We sit down with the Nigerian singer for our latest installment of 'Moments With'

Niniola is the Nigerian queen of afro-house.

Through massive singles like "Maradona" and "Bana"—and standout albums like This Is Me—the singer has taken the throne as the leading artist pushing a blend of afro-pop and house. She's continued that upward trend with more recent drops like "Boda Sodiq" and "Designer." The artist was also one of OkayAfrica's 2019 100 Women honorees.

Niniola sits down with us for this latest edition of Moments With, in which she talks about growing up in Nigeria, the success of "Maradona," and getting recent co-signs from Timbaland and Drake.


Moments With: Niniola youtu.be

Moments With is a cross-brand series between Okayplayer and OkayAfrica, bringing viewers in for an intimate moment with some of the most iconic names and people to watch in entertainment.

CREDITS

Producers | Kam Tambini & Greg Poole

Editor | Israel Nava

Cinematographer | Nicola Benizzi

Sports
Photo: Mini Cho

Mini Cho and the Renaissance of African Surf Culture

Competitive surfing helped Mini Cho find his place in the world. Now he wants to bring other Mozambicans into the fold.

Surfing, in its most basic form, is a surface water sport in which the participant uses a board to ride along a moving wave towards the shore. In theory, this most basic action will have occurred for as long as there have been coastal populations ready to venture out for fishing and exploration. Yet, the development of professional surfing, which had initially been adopted by Australia and the US in the 1970s, and its documentation through surfing photography, has created a surfing culture that has been predominantly framed from a Western perspective.

The origins of surfing are commonly associated with Polynesian and Hawaiian culture, but historians like University of California history professor, Kevin Dawson, have collated documented evidence of the independent history of African wave-riding from as early as the 1640s. In his book, "Undercurrents of Power: Aquatic Culture in the African Diaspora," Dawson explores how populations across the coastlines of Africa had developed sea-dwelling merchants who learned to navigate surf patterns, as a means to open up economic opportunities.

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