Still taken from YouTube.

Dr Zweli Mkhize briefs the media amid the level-3 national lockdown.

South African Health Minister Tests Positive for COVID-19

South African Health Minister Dr. Zweli Mkhize and has wife, Dr May Mkhize, have both tested positive for COVID-19. Dr Mkhize has encouraged South Africans to continue social distancing whilst undergoing self-isolation.

According to TimesLIVE South African Health Minister Dr. Zweli Mkhize has publicly stated that he has tested positive for COVID-19. Mkhize shared the news via social media this past Sunday. The news has been disappointing for many South Africans as Mkhize has been actively and competently guiding the country through the national lockdown through his medical expertise. Messages of support have poured in on Twitter after the release of the Minister's statement.


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Mkhize announced that he and his wife, Dr May Mkhize, tested for the coronavirus after displaying mild symptoms. They subsequently received positive results.

"I was feeling abnormally exhausted and, as the day progressed, I started loosing appetite. My wife had a cough, was dizzy and extremely exhausted. Given her symptoms, the doctors advised that she must be admitted for observation and rehydration."

South Africa has admittedly been robust with their efforts to tackle the coronavirus pandemic. The country currently has the highest number of coronavirus cases on the continent although fatalities are marginally low. Mkhize, a medical doctor, has been at the forefront of efforts to manage the pandemic. Additionally, the WHO sent 43 medical experts to help South Africa prevent the possibility of a second wave of the outbreak. Mkhize welcomed the first batch of these health experts on August 5th.

Mkhize has stated that he believes strongly that he and his wife will fully recover. The Health Minister encouraged South Africans to continue practicing social distancing and sanitising.

South African President Cyril Ramaphosa announced the country's transition to the final level of lockdown a month ago and fears of a second wave have been on the rise. Mkhize has substantiated that coronavirus infection numbers have decreased but that like most countries, a second wave is imminent. He and his wife are currently self-isolating. President Ramaphosa, along with other South Africans, wished Mkhize and his wife a speedy recovery.

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