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(Photo by Jo Hale/Redferns via Getty Images)

South African Musical Icon Johnny Clegg Has Died

Rest in peace to one of "South Africa's greatest sons."

South African musician Johnny Clegg, passed away on Tuesday at his home in Johannesburg, following a four year battle with pancreatic cancer, Reuters reports. He was 66.

The artist was the founder of the bands Juluka and Savuka, two mixed-raced bands formed during the apartheid era. He was known as a vocal critic of the apartheid regime, writing the 1987 song "Asimbonanga" for a then incarcerated Nelson Mandela. The song became a rallying cry for South Africans fighting or freedom.

He performed the tribute with Mandela on stage in 1999, which you can watch below.


Johnny Clegg (With Nelson Mandela) - Asimbonanga - 1999 Fran www.youtube.com

Born in England to a Zimbabwean mother, the artist moved to Johannesburg as a child after his mother remarried. He was fluent in Zulu, often fusing it into his songs along with traditional folk music, or mbaqanga.

He earned a Grammy nomination and won a Billboard Award during his decades-long career. He was the recipient of an Order of Ikhamanga in silver—one of the highest national honors given to South African citizens.

"His music had the ability to unite people across the races and bring them together as a community," read a tribute message from the South African government's Twitter page. "We send our sincere condolences to his family, friends and fans. Clegg has made an indelible mark in the music industry and the hearts of the people."

Clegg's work has had a lasting impact on South African popular music, and tributes have been pouring in from fans, supporters, and fellow musicians in remembrance of the accomplished artist.













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Watch Amanda Black's new music video for 'Ndizele Wena.'

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Egypt's Musicians' Syndicate has recently issued a ban on 'mahraganat' music, according to Egyptian Streets.

The popular street festival genre is a fusion electro, grime and rap, and originated among Cairo's poor during the 2011 revolution which saw the ousting of then president Hosni Mubarak.

The ban comes shortly after a well-known mahraganat singer Hassan Shakoush performed a song whose lyrics were perceived to be "promoting promiscuity and immorality".

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Stormzy performs during The BRIT Awards 2020 at The O2 Arena. (Photo by Samir Hussein/WireImage) via Getty Images.

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The BRIT Awards 2020, which went down earlier this week, saw the likes of Stormzy take home the Best Male trophy home and Dave win Best Album.

The night also saw Stormzy deliver a stunning performance that featured a medley of songs from his latest album, Heavy Is the Head. The British-Ghanaian star started things out slow with "Don't Forget to Breathe," before popping things off with "Do Better" then turning up the heat with "Wiley Flow."

Stormzy nodded to J Hus, playing a short bit of "Fortune Teller," before being joined onstage by Nigeria's Burna Boy to perform their hit "Own It." Burna Boy got his own moment and performed an energetic rendition of his African Giant favorite "Anybody."

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Watch the full performance below.

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A Stolen 18th Century Ethiopian Crown Has Been Returned from The Netherlands

The crown had been hidden in a Dutch apartment for 20 years.

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Read: Bringing African Artifacts Home

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