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(Photo by Jo Hale/Redferns via Getty Images)

South African Musical Icon Johnny Clegg Has Died

Rest in peace to one of "South Africa's greatest sons."

South African musician Johnny Clegg, passed away on Tuesday at his home in Johannesburg, following a four year battle with pancreatic cancer, Reuters reports. He was 66.

The artist was the founder of the bands Juluka and Savuka, two mixed-raced bands formed during the apartheid era. He was known as a vocal critic of the apartheid regime, writing the 1987 song "Asimbonanga" for a then incarcerated Nelson Mandela. The song became a rallying cry for South Africans fighting or freedom.

He performed the tribute with Mandela on stage in 1999, which you can watch below.


Johnny Clegg (With Nelson Mandela) - Asimbonanga - 1999 Fran www.youtube.com

Born in England to a Zimbabwean mother, the artist moved to Johannesburg as a child after his mother remarried. He was fluent in Zulu, often fusing it into his songs along with traditional folk music, or mbaqanga.

He earned a Grammy nomination and won a Billboard Award during his decades-long career. He was the recipient of an Order of Ikhamanga in silver—one of the highest national honors given to South African citizens.

"His music had the ability to unite people across the races and bring them together as a community," read a tribute message from the South African government's Twitter page. "We send our sincere condolences to his family, friends and fans. Clegg has made an indelible mark in the music industry and the hearts of the people."

Clegg's work has had a lasting impact on South African popular music, and tributes have been pouring in from fans, supporters, and fellow musicians in remembrance of the accomplished artist.













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Photo by Minasse Wondimu Hailu/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images.

The African Union Condemns Violence Against #EndSARS Protesters in Nigeria

The African Union Commission chairperson has (finally) condemned the deadly violence against protesters calling for an end to police brutality in Nigeria. However, many feel the body's declaration is a little too late.

EWN reports that the African Union (AU) Commission chairperson Moussa Faki Mahamat has "strongly condemned the violence that erupted on 20 October 2020 during protests in Lagos, Nigeria that has resulted in multiple deaths and injuries." However, Mahamat's statement did not specifically denounce the actions of the security forces' actions. This past Tuesday, protesters calling for the disbandment of the infamous and an end to police brutality, were shot at by security forces at Lekki Toll Gate. The incident occurred shortly after an abrupt 24-hour curfew had been imposed by the State Governor, Babajide Sanwo-Olu, the AU has called for all involved "political and social actors to reject the use of violence and respect human rights and the rule of law" and recommended that they "privilege dialogue".
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