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Hundreds demand to end white supremacy and an end of human concentration camps at the US border during a rally in Philadelphia, PA on July 12, 2019 as the Trump administration announced that ICE will follow up raids and deportations in the following days. (Photo by Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

What Do Impending ICE Raids Mean for Black Migrants?

ICE is expected to begin crackdowns across the US on Sunday, putting thousands of undocumented migrants from Latin America as well as Haiti, Cameroon and DRC at increased risk of abuse and deportation.

Immigrants across the US are bracing themselves for planned ICE (Immigrations and Customs Enforcement) raids, expected to occur in several major US cities beginning on Sunday.

"Trump's delusional declaration of ICE raids this week is a serious threat to Black and immigrant communities," Abraham Paulos, the National Communications Director of the Black Alliance for Just Immigration (BAJI) tells OkayAfrica in a statement on behalf of the organization. "The real immigration crisis is the one created by the Trump administration's racist and xenophobic agenda and policies. This administration has made it a top priority to separate and incarcerate migrant families and to keep Black and Brown asylum seekers and refugees from entering the U.S."

Initial plans to round up groups of undocumented immigrants were halted last month by the Department of Homeland Security and the issue was brought before Congress. Now, authorities are pushing ahead, putting thousands of undocumented families at risk of deportation as ICE—with the backing of President Donald Trump—plan arrests in at least 10 major cities, including New York City, Chicago, Miami, Los Angeles, San Fransisco, New Orleans, Atlanta, Houston and Denver.

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Photo by Nickii Kane.

Lila Iké Is Blooming Into the Powerful New Voice of Jamaican Music

We chat with the rising singer on her journey to stardom and her new music video for "Where I'm Coming From."

It's the closing set at BRIC's Celebrate Brooklyn during a summer evening in Prospect Park. Jamaica's very own Protoje pauses to give Sevana and Lila Iké, two members of his new collective, In.Digg.Nation, their moment to shine on stage.

Iké, born Alecia Grey, shows herself to be a force and light as she dons an all-white suit with her curly afro roaming freely. Not introducing herself until she concludes, there's a clear energy shift in the park as her vibrato nods to the reggae of the past.

Just a few days later, she visits the OkayAfrica offices and her chill demeanor and casual threads beg the question of how she could make sense of who she blooms into when it's time to perform. "I don't even know myself on stage, to be honest," she says. "I don't even think it's 100 percent me."

Sharing how she came to settle into her stage name, she notes that Lila was coined from pet names folks called her from her first name, Alecia. Iké, on the other hand, is usually short for the Nigerian name Ikechukwu in the Igbo language. She also came across an Ikechukwu when she moved to Kingston who's mind, she says, was one to remember. Meaning "God is powerful" or "power of God," it struck her that names such as that can be since she's been surrounded by Johns, Pauls or Marks.

Photo by Nickii Kane.

"I wanted to use Ikechukwu as my stage name," she explains. "I remember I did my very first performance, introduced myself as such and people were calling me all sorts of things and I knew it wasn't going to work. My friend later suggested Lila Ike and I could see it on an album cover. I recently found out that Lila means lilac in Italian and it also means 'the everblooming flower' or 'to bloom.' Words are powerful—I really believe music is the power of God and I wanted to attribute that to my music and my whole being."

Iké's newest music video "Where I'm Coming From" recently dropped and both the song and visual is an ode to her journey from her neighborhood of Christiana in Manchester, Jamaica, to Kingston. With the legacy of Ijahman Levi and Garnett Silk, two hometown heroes, behind her—she's well on her way to be the new face of not only her people, but reggae music, to the world. For Iké, "Where I'm Coming From" is also her way of encouraging people to stay working on themselves and their goals—and to be real.

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Beyoncé, Tiffany Haddish, Florence Kasumba & More Shine at 'The Lion King' World Premiere

Check out a glimpse of the premiere's red carpet as well as a new clip from the film.

The world premiere of Disney's "The Lion King" went down in Hollywood Wednesday and it was a star-studded affair. It also signals that we are getting even closer to its release in theaters as it's set to open July 19, 2019 worldwide.

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