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Osei Bonsu has Been Named the International Art Curator for London's Tate Modern

The British-Ghanaian curator will oversee the African arm of the museum's modern and contemporary art.

Yesterday, Osei Bonsu, was named the international art curator for the African arm of Tate Modern in London. The British-Ghanaian art curator, critic and historian, joins Nabila Abdel Nabi and Devika Singh will respectively oversee the Middle Eastern and Asian arms of modern and contemporary art respectively while Valentina Ravaglia will be in charge of Tate Modern's display programs. The appointment of these talented and diverse individuals is a part of the museum's intentions of steering in a more international direction.

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Photo by Maxine l. Moore

Bassey Ikpi’s Literary Debut on Her Mental Health Journey Is a Call for People To See Themselves, and Others, With Genuine Empathy

We speak with the Nigerian-American writer and ex-poet about her book that challenges us to rethink mental health challenges.

Bassey Ikpi is the Nigerian-American writer whose debut book of essays is the epitome of vulnerability and honesty around the mental health conversation.

In I'm Telling The Truth, But I'm Lying, which has already landed a spot on The New York Times' Best Sellers list, we follow Ikpi as she takes readers on an exploration of her life from her formative years in Nigeria, moving to Oklahoma as a pre-teen, being a black woman, a poet, a mother and her multitude of identities through the lens of one living with the eventual diagnosis of bipolar II and anxiety.

Her name may ring a bell for those familiar with HBO's Def Poetry Jam—Ikpi made her mark with several appearances on the show and her way with prose and words still hold true with this book of essays. Pulling the reader into a gentle tide of her consciousness, truths and lies, Ikpi shakes our preconceived notions of how the mind works and what "normal" even means.

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Star shine, moon glow from Water Life collection by Aida Muluneh commissioned by WaterAid and supported by H&M Foundation

Ethiopian Artist Aida Muluneh's 'Water Life' Is a Response to the Urgent Threat of Water Scarcity

The photo series, shot in the hottest place on earth, will be showing at Somerset House in London starting this September.

The Ethiopian artist Aida Muluneh will bring her highly-acclaimed photo series "Water Life" to London's Somerset House this September, as part of the creative institution's "ongoing strand of environmental programming." The highly-acclaimed series addresses water scarcity—particularly its grave impact on the wellbeing of women and girls.

Described as an "afrofuturist work," the series was shot in Dallol, Afar in Ethiopia, an extreme setting known to have the hottest and driest conditions on earth. "Taking inspiration from traditional ornamentation and body paint from across the African continent, the Ethiopian-born artist has explored not just issues of water scarcity and ecological emergency but also the vital role of art in advocacy and how Africa is represented in global media," reads a description of "Water Life."

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Image by Ofoe Amegavie.

This Stunning Photo Series Re-imagines What Cities Could Look Like in the Future

As Accra undergoes massive urbanization, buildings 'in limbo' are providing an alternative space for creatives and the youth.

Unfinished buildings are commonplace in Accra, Ghana, a city whose landscape is changing every single day. High-rise structures and concrete worlds are overtaking traditional neighborhoods and leaving urban spaces in a state of "limbo"⁠—the future of the city fossilized within the fragments of its past. One of these many unfinished buildings is an estate in the neighborhood of East Legon, and is now the site of a provocative art exhibition, the first of many that will be showcased in unfinished properties across Accra.

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