Popular

The 16 Best South African Songs of the Month (September)

The best South African songs of the month featuring Cassper Nyovest, Rowlene, Langa Mavuso, Muzi, PatricKxxLee and others.

Here are the South African songs and music videos that caught our attention in August.

Follow our MZANSI HEAT playlist on Spotify here and Apple Music here.

PatricKxxLee “One Punk Man, Ritalin”

PatricKxxLee aggressively raps over a beat that combines PlayStation sounds with dark synths and bass.

Langa Mavuso “I Wish” (featuring Manana & Zoe Modiga)

A collaboration that works as one would expect it to, "I Wish" is a somber deep cut from Langa Mavuso's latest album Langa.

FonZo “Survival”

FonZo reminds his naysayers of his accomplishments and that he's nothing to be fucked with.

Muzi “Don’t Let Me Go”

Muzi takes it back to the 80s as he taps into the era's bubblegum sound in a song grieving his late mother.

Yugen Blakrok “OCHRE”

To commemorate Heritage Month in a way that's neither corny nor trite, Yugen Blakrok released the video for "OCHRE" which is a visual celebration of origin, nature and magic.

Costa Titch (featuring Boity) “Thembi”

Costa Titch finally released the music video for his Boity-assisted hit "Thembi" and it's as lively as the song with him showcasing his dance moves and Boity making an elegant appearance as usual.

Willy Cardiac & DJ Maphorisa “Run”

Willy Cardiac sounds comfortable over DJ Maphorisa production in his latest single "Run" which contains traces of R&B, hip-hop and Afro-fusion.

Black Motion “Mshubo” (featuring Ihhashi Elimhlophe)

Black Motion's hypnotic production sounds surreal when combined with maskandi legend Ihhashi Elimhlophe's chants.

GoldFish “Forever Free” (featuring Nate Highfield & Silver)

An instant EDM/pop banger, "Forever Free" is the perfect song for a road trip, the club, your lounge, and pretty much anywhere.

Cassper Nyovest “Thoughts” (featuring Boogie)

Cassper Nyovest's pen bleeds as he opens up about relationships that have gone wrong over horns and keys assisted by an equally intense verse by Boogie.

Moonchild Sanelly “Boys and Girls” (featuring Patty Monroe)

Moonchild Sanelly invites Patty Monroe to assist in a song that's about preferring both men and women. The song's carried by personality as it is by great execution.

Focalistic (featuring Vigro Deep) “Ke Star”

Focalistic released the visual for his gold-certified hit "Ke Star" and the visuals are as extravagant as the song itself.

J Molley “Ang’na Stress” (featuring Costa Titch and Yanga Chief)

J Molley takes a different approach with his latest single as he gets Costa Titch and Yanga Chief to sprinkle their respective flavors.

Aewon Wolf “Say It Louder” (featuring Rey Oceans)

Aewon Wolf's "Say It Louder" is the light-hearted single one needs in such dark times.

Rowlene “Stop”

Rowlene announced her upcoming album with the assertive banger "Stop".

Busiswa (featuring Kamo Mphela) “SBWL”

With her new single "SBWL", Busiswa connects with internet dance sensation Kamo Mphela for a lively amapiano tune.

Music

6 Samples From 'Éthiopiques' in Hip-Hop

A brief history of Ethio-jazz cultural exchange featuring songs by Nas & Damian Marley, K'naan, Madlib and more.

This article was originally published on OkayAfrica in March, 2017. We're republishing it here for our Crossroads series.

It's 2000 something. I'm holed up in my bedroom searching for samples to chop up on Fruity Loops. While deep into the free-market jungle of Amazon's suggested music section, I stumble across a compilation of Ethiopian music with faded pictures of nine guys jamming in white suit jackets. I press play on the 30 second sample.

My mind races with the opportunities these breakbeats offered a budding beat maker. Catchy organs, swinging horns, funky guitar riffs, soulful melodies and grainy and pained vocalists swoon over love lost and gained. Sung in my mother tongue—Amharic—this was a far cry from the corny synthesizer music of the 1990s that my parents played on Saturday mornings. I could actually sample this shit.

The next day, I burn a CD and pop it into my dad's car. His eyes light up when the first notes ooze out of the speakers. “Where did you get this?" He asks puzzlingly. “The internet," I respond smiling.

In the 1970s my dad was one of thousands of high school students in Addis Ababa protesting the monarchy. The protests eventually created instability which lead to a coup d'état. The monarchy was overthrown and a Marxist styled military junta composed of low ranking officers called the Derg came to power. The new regime subsequently banned music they deemed to be counter revolutionary. When the Derg came into power, Amha Eshete, a pioneering record producer and founder of Ahma Records, fled to the US and the master recordings of his label's tracks somehow ended up in a warehouse in Greece.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

How Nigerian Streetwear Brand, Daltimore, is Rising To Celebrity Status

We spoke with founder and creative director David Omigie about expression through clothing and that #BBNaija pic.