News Brief
Mannywellz. Photo courtesy of the artist.

DACA Artists Won 3 Grammy Awards For 'American Dreamers' Album

Many 'Dreamers,' including Nigeria's Mannywellz, performed on the John Daversa Big Band album.

Out of the many headlines coming out of the Grammys, you might have missed this one.

Several artists and recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) won three Grammys last Sunday for their contribution to trumpeter John Daversa's album, American Dreamers: Voices of Hope, Music of Freedom.

The album—which won Best Large Jazz Ensemble Album, Best Improvised Jazz Solo Performance ("Don't Fence Me In") and Best Arrangement, Instrumental or A Capella ("Stars & Stripes Forever")—features contributions from many 'Dreamers' including Nigerian-born Mannywellz.

As a recipient of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) policy, Mannywellz' is one of the 800,000 young immigrants who receive a renewable two-year period of deferred action from deportation and eligibility for work permits. That is all in limbo under the Trump administration's mission to repeal DACA.



Mannywellz is a rising young artist who's toured with Jidenna, collaborated with Adekunle Gold, and garnered millions of plays on streaming services. The ultimate decision on DACA could crush Mannywellz' career.

We interviewed him last year when he told us, "It was tough before DACA. I couldn't get a regular job, so I had to buy Jordans or phones and flip them just to pay my own phone bill. Things were hard. My dad had moved back to Nigeria, so it was just my mom and my younger siblings. That was five years ago or so in 2012. I remember my friends being able to drive when they were 16 and I had to wait until I was 19 or 20 years-old to get a freaking permit. Receiving the DACA was a relief because I was able to get a regular job—from Ledo's to Sun Trust to PNC, you know."

However he, like many other DACA kids, remains positive, "My main goal is to inspire kids that are just like me. Coming out and letting everyone know that they're not alone in this DACA fight and that we can stand together, pray together and make something happen. I think that's my main goal with my art, with what I stand for and what I release on social media."

Listen to American Dreamers: Voices of Hope, Music of Freedom from John Daversa Big Band and DACA artists below.

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Photo by -/AFP via Getty Images

Sudan Declares State of Emergency, As Military Dissolves Transitional Government

As the North African country edged closer to democracy, Sudan's military has seized power.

Sudan's military has seized power over the North African country, arresting multiple civilian leaders, including the current Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok. The power-sharing, unstable coalition, called the Sovereign Council, was created as a transitional government after the fall of dictator Omar al-Bashir in 2019, in an attempt to move towards a democratic Sudan.

The Sudanese public has been split in recent weeks as groups protested for a military-run state, while others pushed for a civilian lead, democratic nation. Last week, the Prime Minister vocalized his plans towards a full transition to civilian rule, and his plans to have that body in place by November 17, echoing the voices of thousands of Sudanese demonstrators who showed up in hoards to demand that the promise of Sudan's pro-democracy movement be honored. But on Monday the PM and multiple government ministers and officials were placed under arrest, resulting in Sudan's top general's declaring State of Emergency.

General Abdel Fattah al-Burhan said in a televised statement, "To rectify the revolution's course, we have decided to declare a state of emergency nationwide… dissolve the transitional sovereign council, and dissolve the cabinet." His statement came as soldiers fired live rounds at anti-military protestors, outside of the army headquarters in the capital.

Internet services were cut across the country around dawn and the main roads and bridges into Khartoum shut, before soldiers stormed the headquarters of Sudan's state broadcaster in the capital's twin city of Omdurman, the ministry said. After months of rising tensions in the country, army and paramilitary troops have been deployed across the capital city, Khartoum, with the airports and internet access being shut down. As a result of the coup, hundreds of protestors have taken to the streets, demanding the return of a civilian ruled and the transitional government, the BBC reports.

Demonstrators have spread to a number of Sudanese cities including Atbara, Wad Madani, and Port Sudan, and more are expected to attend the call for action. "We will not leave the streets until the civilian government is back and the transition is back," protest attendee Sawsan Bashir told AFP. While demonstrator Haitham Mohamed says, "We are ready to give our lives for the democratic transition in Sudan."


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