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Photo by D'Anthony Photography, courtesy of Studio 189.

NYFW: This Is What Studio 189's First Fall Collection Looks Like

The sustainable fashion brand co-founded by Abrima Erwiah and Rosario Dawson once again levels up this fashion season.

Sustainable fashion brand Studio 189 debuted a stunning fall collection in celebration of their 6-year anniversary at Spring Street Studios during New York Fashion Week.

Sunday Best—the brand's first fall collection—is a color-rich nod to vintage family portraits we know so well taken by the revered photographer Malick Sidibé, Moroccan artist Hassan Hajjaj's eclectic contemporary work, as well as Phyllis Galembo's portrait-style documentation of West African masquerade costumes.

"When we walk around Ghana, for example, we see so many well-dressed people that is reminiscent to us of the old studio style portraits," Abrima Erwiah, co-founder of Studio 189 with actor Rosario Dawson and co-creative director, says in a statement. "We love the idea of people dressing their best—a market seller, a street vendor, a doctor or a lawyer—everyone looks equally amazing."


Opting for a presentation in lieu of their straight-forward (and fabulous) runway show last year, their diverse and inclusive models donned the brand's new editions of floor length ruffle skirts, wide-leg, fitted jumpsuits with blouson sleeves along with pouf blouson sleeves and neck ties to their existing silhouettes. Vibrant hues of indigo, brown and yellow earth tones, with pops of bright red, blue, green and hints of red are a constant in the collection.

Studio 189 continues to be steadfast and consistent in their mission to innovate the value chain of a single garment. "The Fall 2019 collection was designed with taking key lessons learned from the past, applying them to present day, in order to design a product that is made with the next 50 years in mind," the brand declares. "Our goal is to design products that are built to last and can stand the test of time with circularity in mind."

The brand collaborated once again with their artisans and production facility in Ghana, as well as linking with the UN Ethical Fashion Initiative in Haiti and Burkina Faso, as well as design company Xoomba in Burkina Faso.

Take a look at our favorite looks from Studio 189's Sunday Best collection, photographed by D'Anthony Photography, below.

Courtesy of Studio 189.

Courtesy of Studio 189.

Courtesy of Studio 189.

Courtesy of Studio 189.

Courtesy of Studio 189.

Courtesy of Studio 189.

Courtesy of Studio 189.

Courtesy of Studio 189.

Courtesy of Studio 189.

Courtesy of Studio 189.

Courtesy of Studio 189.

Courtesy of Studio 189.

Courtesy of Studio 189.

Interview
Photo: Shawn Theodore via Schure Media Group/Roc Nation

Interview: Buju Banton Is a Lyrical Purveyor of African Truth

A candid conversation with the Jamaican icon about his new album, Upside Down 2020, his influence on afrobeats, and the new generation of dancehall.

Devout fans of reggae music have been longing for new musical offerings from Mark Anthony Myrie, widely-known as the iconic reggae superstar Buju Banton. A shining son of Jamaican soil, with humble beginnings as one of 15 siblings in the close-knit community of Salt Lane, Kingston, the 46-year-old musician is now a legend in his own right.

Buju Banton has 12 albums under his belt, one Grammy Award win for Best Reggae Album, numerous classic hits and a 30-year domination of the industry. His larger-than-life persona, however, is more than just the string of accolades that follow in the shadows of his career. It is his dutiful, authentic style of Caribbean storytelling that has captured the minds and hearts of those who have joined him on this long career ride.

The current socio-economic climate of uncertainty that the COVID-19 pandemic has thrusted onto the world, coupled with the intensified fight against racism throughout the diaspora, have taken centre stage within the last few months. Indubitably, this makes Buju—and by extension, his new album—a timely and familiar voice of reason in a revolution that has called for creative evolution.

With his highly-anticipated album, Upside Down 2020, the stage is set for Gargamel. The title of this latest discography feels nothing short of serendipitous, and with tracks such as "Memories" featuring John Legend and the follow-up dancehall single "Blessed," it's clear that this latest body of work is a rare gem that speaks truth to vision and celebrates our polylithic African heritage in its rich fullness and complexities.

Having had an exclusive listen to some other tracks on the album back in April, our candid one-on-one conversation with Buju Banton journeys through his inspiration, collaboration and direction for Upside Down 2020, African cultural linkages and the next generational wave of dancehall and reggae.

This interview has been shortened and edited for clarity.

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