Style
Image courtesy of Studio 189

Studio 189 Brought 'Heritage' to the Runway During NYFW

Take a look at the sustainable brand's Spring 2020 collection.

Studio 189—the sustainable fashion brand created by Rosario Dawson and Abrima Erwiah, debuted their Spring 2020 collection during New York Fashion Week (NYFW).

OkayAfrica was in attendance at Spring Studio this past Tuesday for the brand's runway show, which brought out 600 guests from various industries. Amongst those in attendance included Fantasia, Naturi Naughton, Quincy Brown, Opal Tometti, Young Paris, Quincy Brown, Justine Skye, Shaun Ross and many more. The show also featured musical performances "inspired by the continent of Africa" from Jojo Abot and more.


The "made in Ghana"collection, entitled "Heritage," features designs "inspired by traditional patterns, symbols and techniques interwoven into cloth that communicates our values, history and message to future generations," said the co-founders in a statement.

"For Spring we introduced new silhouettes such as a double-breasted suit for women, a ruffle tiered dress, a long flowing shirt dress, an off the shoulder caftan and a fringe wrap skirt." The design came in a range of vibrant pastels, with palm prints, reflecting the breezy atmosphere in which the line is produced. "The color palette is reflective of colors found in the American and Ghanaian flag as well as colors we see in nature," the duo added. "The indigo derives from the indigofera plant made using a traditional technique of natural indigo to woven cotton. We introduce pastel colors such as lilac and pink."

Earlier this year, Studio 189 won of the prestigious CFDA Lexus Fashion Award for their commitment to producing sustainable fashion.

Check out some of the action at their recent NYFW show below.

Image courtesy of Studio 189

Image courtesy of Studio 189

Image courtesy of Studio 189

Image courtesy of Studio 189

Image courtesy of Studio 189

Image courtesy of Studio 189

Image courtesy of Studio 189

Image courtesy of Studio 189

Image courtesy of Studio 189

Image courtesy of Studio 189

Image courtesy of Studio 189

Image courtesy of Studio 189

Image courtesy of Studio 189

Image courtesy of Studio 189

Image courtesy of Studio 189

Image courtesy of Studio 189

Image courtesy of Studio 189

Image courtesy of Studio 189

Image courtesy of Studio 189

Image courtesy of Studio 189

Image courtesy of Studio 189

Image courtesy of Studio 189

Image courtesy of Studio 189

Image courtesy of Studio 189

Image courtesy of Studio 189

Image courtesy of Studio 189

Image courtesy of Studio 189

Image courtesy of Studio 189

Image courtesy of Studio 189

Image courtesy of Studio 189

Image courtesy of Studio 189

Image courtesy of Studio 189

Image courtesy of Studio 189

Image courtesy of Studio 189

Image courtesy of Studio 189

Image courtesy of studio 189

Image courtesy of Studio 189





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(Photo by Emma McIntyre/Getty Images)

Idris Elba to Star In Netflix's Upcoming All-Black Western 'The Harder They Fall'

The film also stars Jonathan Majors and is being produced by Jay-Z.

Idris Elba is set to star in the upcoming all black Western The Harder They Fall from first-time director Jeymes Samuel.

The film, is slated to premiere on Netflix, and also stars The Last Black Man In San Fransisco actor, Jonathan Majors. The film is being produced by Samuel, as well as Jay-Z, who will also help write original music for the movie along with Samuel, Deadline reports. The two previously worked together on the Great Gatsby.

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Photos: How La Sunday Became Abidjan's Favorite Party

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Sundays in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire had always been reserved for beach trips and family time. All of this changed dramatically in December of 2018 when Fayçal Lazraq, Lionel Obam, Aurore Aoussi, Charles Tanoh-Boutchoue, and Aziz Doumbia, better known as Bain de Foule Creative Studio created La Sunday and it took Abidan by storm.

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'54 Silhouettes' at the British Council of Nigeria's Lagos Theatre Festival. Photo: Drive Adebayo.

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Sarz. Photo: Manny Jefferson. Courtesy of the artist.

Interview: Sarz Has Powered a Generation of Nigerian Music—and He Isn't Stopping Anytime Soon

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When Sarz talks about music, his eyes light up. They dart with excitement as he runs through topics like sounds, production, trends, and innovation. These are all words that represent his life's work of impactful music production, which has powered a generation of music in Nigeria, and is currently playing a role in its international future. Sitting at the offices, decked in a white t-shirt, red trousers and Nike kicks, he makes a point that he rarely grants interviews. And when he does, it's in spaces like this, in rooms and studios where his business is conducted, and his work is birthed and refined for public impact.

Born Osabuohien Osaretin, the 30-year-old music producer discovered sounds by accident when his ears would automatically pick apart music and focus on the beat. Interestingly, he discovered that he could remember every beat in detail. It was the entry point to a career that took off in 2010 when he scored his first hit on Jahbless' "Joor Oh" remix—during the formative stages of the current Nigerian pop success—and has provided sounds that have shaped the culture and given it its biggest moments.

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"I'm inspired by the thoughts of how far I can take music. Just thinking about where this music can take me to," Sarz says, taking swigs from a water bottle. The producer has also worked with the biggest stars in afrobeats, and a look through his catalogue has hits every year since 2007.

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Sarz. Photo: Manny Jefferson. Courtesy of the artist.

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