News Brief
Photo: Gio Kardava (via XL)

Ibeyi Return With Hypnotizing New Song 'Recurring Dream'

Afro-Cuban twin sisters Naomi and Lisa-Kaindé Díaz are back.

Ibeyi—longtime OkayAfrica favorites—have been relatively quiet for a while, but they've now shared the new single "Recurring Dream," an original song written from Ed Morris' film How to Stop a Recurring Dream.

The Afro-Cuban twin sister duo of Naomi and Lisa-Kaindé Díaz made their mark with their XL Recordings albums Ibeyi (2015) and Ash (2017), as well as notable features like being in Beyoncé's Lemonade. They now return with the hypnotizing, synth-lead "Recurring Dream."

Ibeyi previously worked with director Ed Morris on several music videos, including the standout "River." His new film, How to Stop A Recurring Dream, stars Ruby Barker (Bridgerton) and is available for streaming now.

Ibeyi are currently working on their third studio album. In the meantime, check out "Recurring Dream" below and revisit their performance for OkayAcoustic underneath.

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Interview
Photo: Mariela Alvarez.

Interview: ÌFÉ Blends Music & Religion to Honor Those Who Have Died During the Pandemic

Producer and percussionist Otura Mun talks about his latest EP, The Living Dead, and how he traces the influences of West Africa in his new work.

There are bands that open up a spiritual world through their music. ÌFÉ is one example. An electro-futurist band that fuses Afro-Cuban rhythms and Jamaican dancehall with Yoruba mystical voices. With the success of their 2017 debut album "IIII+IIII" (pronounced Eji-Ogbe), ÌFÉ has reached an audience that is looking for Caribbean and contemporary sounds.

The Puerto Rican-based band just released a new EP, The Living Dead- Ashé Bogbo Egun, that aims to heal and honor those who have died during this pandemic. Otura Mun, the band leader, is an African-American producer and percussionist, who began a personal journey about a decade ago, when he landed in San Juan, and decided to move there. He learned Spanish, dug deep into his African ancestry and started to practice the Yoruba-Caribbean religion of Santería.

ÌFÉ, which means "love and expansion" in Yoruba, ties two worlds, music and religion, artistically. This new EP modernized prayer songs to hopefully make them more accessible to a younger generation. OkayAfrica spoke with Otura Mun on his latest work.

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