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Still from 'Agege' video.

Tekno Is a 'Threat to Security,' After Releasing Pole Dancing Video, Nigerian Authorities Say

Nigeria's Coucil of Arts and Culture says it wants to "scapegoat" the artist in order to "teach others a serious lesson."

Nigerian artist Tekno, has been accused of "threatening security" after the release of his latest music video "Agege," BBC Africa reports.

The singer was brought in for questioning last Wednesday, after Lagos police claimed he breached public decency laws after a video of him in a truck with semi-nude women went viral after someone spotted the scene in Lagos traffic. He was taken in for questioning over allegations that he was doing promotion for a strip club.

The artist apologized for the incident, releasing a statement explaining that the setup was for an upcoming music video he was shooting, and that he and his friends were simply "having fun" as they moved between locations for the shoot.

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Ugandan prominent human rights activist and feminist Stella Nyanzi (C) reacts to police officers during a protest against the amount and handling of police investigations into murders and kidnappings of women in Kampala on June 5, 2018. (Photo by SUMY SADURNI/AFP/Getty Images)

Ugandan Activist, Stella Nyanzi, Found Guilty of Cyber Harassment Against President Museveni

The activist has been sentenced to 18 months in prison over a poem she wrote about the president last year, referencing vaginas.

Stella Nyanzi, the outspoken Ugandan activist and former research fellow at Makerere University's Institute for Social Research, was found guilty of cyber harassment against President Yoweri Museveni on Friday, after sharing a controversial birthday poem for the president last September.

Nyanzi was arrested in November of last year after sharing the poem on her Facebook page, part of which read: "I wish the acidic pus flooding Esiteri's (the president's mother) vaginal canal had burn up your unborn fetus. Burn you up as badly as you have corroded all morality and professionalism out of our public institutions in Uganda."

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image of Congolese ballot via Monusco

Internet Shut Down in Democratic Republic of Congo Continues

Here are some updates on the contested election

The internet has been down in the Democratic Republic of Congo for three days now following a controversial voting process.

This year, President Joseph Kabila will be stepping down from office after 18 years in power. The presidential race between the new candidates Martin Fayulu and Felix Tshisekedi has been filled with controversy from the fire that destroyed voting machines earlier on in the elections. Following that incidence, BBC reports that 1.26 million voters were excluded from the voting process because of the ebola outbreak and logistical reasons, 20% of polling stations opened late, and the military was reported to be intimidating voters.

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Uganda Has Imposed a Controversial Social Media Tax 'To Stop Gossip'

The Excise Duty Bill will go into effect in July, but many question how it will be implemented.

In April, it was announced that the Ugandan government planned to impose a controversial social media tax on users who use sites to "gossip." The law has now been passed and the changes will go into effect starting July 1, reports BBC Africa.

The policy will enforce a 200 shilling ($0.05) levy on people using Facebook, Twitter, WhatsApp and Viber. The new amendment will also affect mobile money transactions.

The government claims that the tax will go towards paying off national debt. President Yoweri Museveni, believes it will also help curb gossip.

"We're looking for money to maintain the security of the country and extend electricity so that you people can enjoy more of social media, more often, more frequently," said Uganda's Finance Minister Matia Kasaija, when the bill was first announced.

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