Interview
Image courtesy of Kojey Radical.

Interview: Kojey Radical On the Importance of His Dual British-Ghanaian Identity

The British-Ghanaian artist talks about growing up in East London, getting in touch with his Ghanaian heritage and his new project, Cashmere Tears.

In this age of technology, "creative" is a blanket term facilitating the spread of multiple talents, which is readily seen in copious social media bios. The phrase "Jack of all trades, master of none," springs to mind in that respect, yet now and again an artist follows the path of the polymath and blooms.

Kojey Radical is one who belies his young years as a studious figure who incorporates a myriad of experimentation via spoken word, fashion, design and music, just (to name a few.

Born Kwadwo Adu Genfi Amponsah in London, of Ghanaian descent, Kojey has navigated the underground with a number of insightful and acclaimed projects tracing his own identity as he builds visual narratives themes on depression, love and God.

Following the recent release of Cashmere Tears, we speak to the accomplished artist on growing up in London, the experience of dual heritage, and headlining his first festival this year.

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Watch Kojey Radical's Striking New Video For 'Can't Go Back'

Funk & soul-influences are paired with beautiful dance moves in this new video from the British-Ghanaian artist.

Kojey Radical is readying the release of his third project, which will look to explore themes of depression, god, family, self-worth, creativity, and love, according to his team.

The British-Ghanaian artist is now sharing the striking new music video for the album's lead single "Can't Go Back," a song we included in our favorite Ghanaian tracks the month.

The new music video for "Can't Go Back," directed by Kojey Radical and longtime creative partner Charlie Di Placido, pairs the song's funk and soul-influences with alluring dances performed in an empty warehouse. The track and video are both seemingly uplifting but also have a darker undertone as they address the artist's struggles with depression.

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