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Boity and Dee Koala Totally Own ‘Utatakho Remix’

Boity and Dee Koala deliver great verses on "Utatakho Remix."

One of the most anticipated songs of the year was the remix to "Utatakho" by Yanga Chief. It's the combination of rappers enlisted on the song and of course the fact that the original is a heater that raised everyone's curiosity.

Riky Rick takes the opening verse, and drops decent bars, but things start taking a different turn from Dee Koala's verse. The Cape Town emcee frolics over the beat, switching flows, aligning her bars perfectly with the instrumental. She shows love to her city and reminds you she's great.

In her verse, Boity opens about her personal issues with her father: "Personally, this is a touchy subject/ 'Cause my dad was live but his presence wasn't/ So my mama was everything daddy wasn't," and goes on to say she holds no grudge towards her father, and refusing to dwell on that, she chooses to be grateful for her present life.

One thing is clear, Boity can rap. Her verse on this remix is seamlessly delivered in both English and Setswana. Every word she utters sounds believable. She has been consistently dope since she released her first song last year, "Wuz Dat."

"Utatakho Remix" is the closing song on Yanga Chief's recently released EP Becoming a Pop Star. The nine-track project includes the original version of "Utatakho" and the song "200," which was released last week. Apart from the guests on the remix, features on BAPS include AKA and Makwa.

Listen to Becoming a Pop Star below:



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