Still from YouTube.

Teni the Entertainer's 'Sugar Mummy' Is an Anthem for Women Who are 'Proud to Be Different'


"There's an assumption that women have to look a certain way to be feminine, but I don't want to conform to that stereotype. My thing is this: You don't get to decide how I choose to live my life," the artist tells Vogue Magazine.

Nothing can hold Teni the Entertainer back, and this message is clear as ever in her latest music video "Sugar Mummy."

In the upbeat song, the artist lets the world know that she's willing to take on anyone who gets in her way—especially the haters and naysayers. In the song's lively music video, directed by DK, the artist can be seen doing just that—taking on folks on the street before having an intense, but hilarious eba and chicken eating contest with popular Nigerian actress Eniola Badmus.

READ: Teni the Entertainer is the Breakout Star of 2018

"I want to make 'Sugar Mummy' a positive term," says the artist in a recent profile in Vogue. "She is a woman with swag, who looks good, who is proud to be different."


Teni - Sugar Mummy (Official Viral Video) youtu.be

The 26-year-old artist spoke with the magazine about her time attending a "PWI" in the States, her style and love for sneakers, as well as her dedication to owning who she is despite the pressures often placed on women to look and act a certain way:

There's an assumption that women have to look a certain way to be feminine, but I don't want to conform to that stereotype. My thing is this: You don't get to decide how I choose to live my life. I'm being me—respect that.

She also discussed using her growing platform for good, revealing a time when she helped a fan going through a dire situation.

This girl was on the verge of committing suicide, so I immediately got her number and reached out to her," she says. "She explained that watching my funny Instagram videos had kept her going. It was in that moment that I realized how powerful my influence can be. If I can be a source of hope and joy to somebody, then I'm doing something right.

When we caught up with the artist last December, she expressed a similar sentiment about wanting to bring people joy through her music and Instagram comedy. "Teni the Entertainer is about bringing positivity into a world that needs a lot of it through entertainment," she told OkayAfrica, "It could be turning societal issues around me into light-hearted moments, or singing about them. Regardless, it is all about making the world a happier place."

With "Sugar Mummy" the artist is keeping good on her mission to deliver feel-good entertainment. Watch the energetic music video above.

Music

6 Samples From 'Éthiopiques' in Hip-Hop

A brief history of Ethio-jazz cultural exchange featuring songs by Nas & Damian Marley, K'naan, Madlib and more.

This article was originally published on OkayAfrica in March, 2017. We're republishing it here for our Crossroads series.

It's 2000 something. I'm holed up in my bedroom searching for samples to chop up on Fruity Loops. While deep into the free-market jungle of Amazon's suggested music section, I stumble across a compilation of Ethiopian music with faded pictures of nine guys jamming in white suit jackets. I press play on the 30 second sample.

My mind races with the opportunities these breakbeats offered a budding beat maker. Catchy organs, swinging horns, funky guitar riffs, soulful melodies and grainy and pained vocalists swoon over love lost and gained. Sung in my mother tongue—Amharic—this was a far cry from the corny synthesizer music of the 1990s that my parents played on Saturday mornings. I could actually sample this shit.

The next day, I burn a CD and pop it into my dad's car. His eyes light up when the first notes ooze out of the speakers. “Where did you get this?" He asks puzzlingly. “The internet," I respond smiling.

In the 1970s my dad was one of thousands of high school students in Addis Ababa protesting the monarchy. The protests eventually created instability which lead to a coup d'état. The monarchy was overthrown and a Marxist styled military junta composed of low ranking officers called the Derg came to power. The new regime subsequently banned music they deemed to be counter revolutionary. When the Derg came into power, Amha Eshete, a pioneering record producer and founder of Ahma Records, fled to the US and the master recordings of his label's tracks somehow ended up in a warehouse in Greece.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

How Nigerian Streetwear Brand, Daltimore, is Rising To Celebrity Status

We spoke with founder and creative director David Omigie about expression through clothing and that #BBNaija pic.