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US Missionary Worker Pleads Guilty to Sex Crimes in Kenyan Orphanage

After being investigated by the FBI and Kenya authorities, Gregory Dow pleaded guilty on Monday to sexually molesting Kenyan orphans as young as 11-years old.

Gregory Dow, a 61-year-old US missionary from Pennsylvania, has pleaded guilty to four counts of engaging in illicit sexual conduct with a minor, between 2013 and 2017.

Dow moved to West Kenyan town Boito in 2008 to build and run the Dow Family Children's Home. To build the home, The Lancaster, PA native received partial funding from local churches and supporters. After having caught wind of the accusations, Dow fled Kenya in 2017 and returned to the US.


Prosecutors stated that Dow's victims ranged between the ages of 11 to 13 years old, and that, " [Dow] purported to be a Christian missionary who would care for these orphans. They called him 'Dad.' But, instead of being a father figure for them, he preyed on their youth and vulnerability."

It has also been revealed by the U.S. attorney's office that in 1996 Dow pleaded guilty to assault to commit sexual abuse in the US state of Iowa. At the time, he received two years' probation and was ordered to register as a sex offender for a decade.

On the matter, US attorney William McSwain went on to say, "Gregory Dow hid behind his supposed faith on the other side of the world, hoping no-one in the US would know or care about the children he abused. He was wrong."

Interview
Photo: Benoit Peverelli

Interview: Oumou Sangaré Proves Why She's the Songbird of Wassoulou

We caught up with the Malian singer to talk about her new Acoustic album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

When Oumou Sangaré tells me freedom is at her core, I am not surprised. If you listen to her discography, you'll be hard-pressed to find a song that doesn't center or in some way touch on women's rights or child abuse. The Grammy award-winning Malian singer has spent a significant part of her career using her voice to fight for the rights of women across Africa and the world, a testimony to this is her naming her debut studio album Moussolou, meaning Woman. The album, a pure masterpiece that solidified Oumou's place amongst the greats and earned her the name 'Songbird of Wassoulou,' was a commercial success selling over 250,000 records in Africa and would in turn go on to inspire other singers across the world.

On her latest body of work Acoustic, a reworking of her critically acclaimed 2017 album Mogoya, Oumou Sangaré proves how and why she earned her accolades. The entirety of the 11-track album was recorded within two days in the Midi Live studio in Villetaneuse in 'live' conditions—with no amplification, no retakes or overdubs, no headphones. Throughout the album, using her powerful and raw voice that has come to define feminism in Africa and shaped opinions across the continent, Oumou boldly addresses themes like loss, polygamy and female circumcision.

We caught up with the Malian singer at the studio she is staying while in quarantine to talk about her new album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

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