Photo by STRINGER/AFP via Getty Images.

Tanzanian Government Declares Country Free of COVID-19.

Tanzanian Government Declares Country Free of COVID-19

While WHO has expressed concern over Tanzania's overall COVID-19 response, President John Magufuli says the country is now free from the pandemic due to 'citizens' prayers'.

Tanzanian President John Magufuli recently declared that the country is now free of the coronavirus, according to reports by the BBC. The move is yet another controversial one in what the World Health Organisation (WHO) has since described as a "concerning" response by the government to the COVID-19 pandemic.

In his announcement, President Magufuli said, "I want to thank Tanzanians of all faiths." He went on to add, "We have been praying and fasting for God to save us from the pandemic that has afflicted our country and the world. But God has answered us. I believe, and I'm certain that many Tanzanians believe, that the corona disease has been eliminated by God."

However, major opposition parties have condemned the ruling government and accused it of being "reckless" with the lives of citizens. Zitto Kabwe, leader of the Alliance for Change and Transparency, says, "The government say there are no patients in the hospitals but we know of three hospitals in Dar es Salaam where the ICU beds are all completely full."

For close to a month, authorities have not provided updated statistics of coronavirus spread in the country despite requests for the data by WHO. This is in stark contrast to other African countries such as South Africa and Nigeria which have consistently released new COVID-19 figures daily. As of April 29th, there were reportedly 480 confirmed cases of the coronavirus in Tanzania with 16 deaths. Not much else is known beyond that date.

Additionally, Tanzania is one of the few African countries which ordered a large consignment of Madagascar's COVID-Organics herbal tonic which has been touted as a "cure". The tonic has however not undergone any proper scientific testing.

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Photo: Alvin Ukpeh.

The Year Is 2020 & the Future of Nigeria Is the Youth

We discuss the strength in resolve of Nigeria's youth, their use of social media to speak up, and the young digital platforms circumventing the legacy media propaganda machine. We also get first-hand accounts from young creatives on being extorted by SARS and why they believe the protests are so important.

In the midst of a pandemic-rife 2020, the voices of African youth have gotten louder in demand for a better present and future. From structural reforms, women's rights, LGBTQ rights, and derelict states of public service, the youths have amplified their voices via the internet and social media, to cohesively express grievances that would hitherto have been quelled at a whisper.

Nigerian youth have used the internet and social media to create and sustain a loud voice for themselves. The expression of frustration and the calls for change may have started online, but it's having a profound effect on the lives of every Nigerian with each passing day. What started as the twitter hashtag #EndSARS has grown into a nationwide youth revolution led by the people.

Even after the government supposedly disbanded the SARS (Special Anti-Robbery Squad) unit on the 10th of October, young Nigerians have not relented in their demands for better policing. The lack of trust for government promises has kept the youth protesting on the streets and online.

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