Style

Check Out This Thrilling New Book of Style Photos From Kenya's Nest Collective

The photos in Not African Enough argue that Kenyan Designers have a lot more to offer than wax print.

Kenyan creatives are challenging the belief that wax prints sum up African fashion in a 367-paged book with striking images and thoughtful essays. Not African Enough (NAE) is The Nest Collective's first fashion book (but second publication) documenting an exciting group of Kenyan designers through photography and essays.

Fourteen pros showcase modern looks in apparel and accessories that reflect the country's multi-cultural vibe, and the designers' global outlook including Adèle Dejak, Wambui, Kibue, Ami Doshi Shah, Ambica Shah, and Katungulu Mwendwa.

Scroll down for a gallery of photos from the book.

The Nest has a record of successful sartorial ventures including a few fashion films (Urban Hunter, Dinka Translation and To Catch A Dream—to name a few ) and at one point, an online store (Chico Leco) once favored by Nairobi's cool kids. Influencers and bloggers are already tweeting and Instagramming copies of the book.

"I have a love-hate relationship with wax print because I feel like it's not a great portrayal of our industry—we don't manufacture those prints here," explains Firyal Nur.

The designer does feature a few prints in her collection, but says: "I'm trying to understand how I can take what I love from them and reflect that without being part of this vicious cycle of wax print." So while not all designers are gaga for wax prints made in Netherlands or China, designer Anyango Mpinga admits to appreciating them—to a point. "I have always loved prints. However, I have never wanted what we so fondly refer to as 'African prints' to define my authenticity as an African designer."

Muqaddam Latif and Keith Macharia of M+K designed, skipped the African prints to show how sexy speckled hair-on leather pencil skirts, satin jumpsuits and shirt dresses can be with a fire womenswear collection that is modern and sleek.

If you're curious to find out more about the changes and conversations on the ground in Kenya, NAE definitely delivers. Adding to the book's appeal is the insightful commentary about disrupting the status quo, elevating fashion show production, exploring minimalism, creating a Kenyan national dress and navigating the tricky world of e-commerce .

One of the disruptors in the Kenyan fashion scene is Sunny Dolat, who is the NAE Creative Director. He has come a long way from scouring Nairobi's open-air markets for inexpensive yet fabulous pieces. Back in 2011, collaborations with visual artist/filmmaker Jim Chuchu (Tuko Macho) for their 'Stingo'—slang for 'style'—project required a lot of resourcefulness. Since then, Dolat has become a noted influencer who reflects on the changes in the industry, stating: "Conversations with government are also much more productive. They have become more open to the sector's huge economic potential especially regarding job promotion, and are figuring out how to chip in through policy reforms, as well as manufacturing and import subsidies."

Not African Enough leaves no doubt that the industry's growth and global appeal is growing, and that luxury and world-class design live in Kenya. The present and future state of fashion in Kenya never looked so cool.

Photos from Not African Enough

Designer - M+K

Photographer Maganga Mwagogo, Model - Juliet Kiruhi

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Photo still via TIFF.

Watch the Striking Trailer for 'Farming'—Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje's Directorial Debut

This is a must-watch.

The trailer for Farming, Nigerian-British actor Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje's directorial debut, is here.

"Between the 1960s and the 1980s, thousands of Nigerian children were farmed out to white working class families in the UK," the trailer begins. "This is the true story of just one of them."

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Politics
Image by Fibonacci Blue via Flickr.

#IStandWithIlhan: Supporters Rally Behind Ilhan Omar Following Racist 'Send Her Back' Chant

"I am here where I belong, at the people's house, and you're just going to have to deal,"—Congresswoman Ilhan Omar

Social media continues to rally behind Representative Ilhan Omar, following a series of racist remarks targeted at her and several other congresswoman of color by President Donald Trump.

The president doubled down on his racist rhetoric during a re-election rally in North Carolina on Wednesday, attendees began chanting "send her back," referring to Omar—echoing anti-imigrant remarks that the president tweeted last week, in which he wrote that four congresswomen of color: Omar, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Ayanna Pressley and Rashida Tlaib should "go back" to where they came from.

This is far from the first time that Omar has been on the receiving end of racist and Islamophobic attacks and referred to as un-American on account of her Somali heritage.

READ: Op-Ed: In Defense of the Black Boogeyman

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Sir Elvis in "Loving Man" (Youtube)

6 African Country Musicians You Should Check Out

Featuring Sir Elvis, Jess Sah Bi & Peter One, Emma Ogosi and more.

With Lil Nas X's EP going straight to number on the American charts, it seems like country music revival is taking over 2019 and beyond, thanks to its unlikely fusion with trap music. It only makes sense that black people are reclaiming the genre, as country was actually partly created by black American artists and heavily influenced by gospel music.

On top of that, plenty of lesser known black artists and bands are making country, or country-infused, music. This is especially the case in Africa, where the genre has been around for a few decades and an increasing number of musicians are gaining momentum. By gaining popularity in Africa, country is coming back to its roots, as country guitar and the way of playing it was originally inspired by the banjo— an instrument that African slaves brought with them to America.

Country music has a strong appeal across the African continent for several reasons: the similarity with many African instruments and the recurring lyrics and themes about love, heartbreak and "the land." At the heart of it, country music has an appeal to working class people all over the world who feel let down by the people that were supposed to help them.

Country music is played regularly on the radio in countries such as Kenya, Tanzania and Malawi but yet, the artists featured are overwhelmingly white and American. African country singers do not get the respect they deserve or are seen as anomalies. With the growing number of them making country music, here is a list of the ones you need to listen to right now.

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