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Several Cultural Figures Sign Petition Supporting Ghana's LGBT Community

Naomi Campbell, Idris Elba, Edward Enninful and several others have signed a petition calling on Ghana's President Nana Akufo-Addo to support and protect the LGBT community which is under continued targeting.

Several celebrities, cultural figures and allies, both on the continent and abroad, have signed a petition in support of Ghana's LGBT community. The petition comes after the country's first and only LGBT centre was shut down last week after a raid by security forces which was reportedly prompted by politicians and religious leaders calling for the closure of the centre barely a month after it opened its doors.


READ: The World Congress of Families is Expanding its Homophobic Agenda into West Africa

Under the online banner of #GhanaSupportsEquality, the LGBT community in Ghana is gaining both local and international support. The likes of supermodel Naomi Campbell, actresses Yvonne Orji and Gabourey Sidibe, photographer Joshua Kissi, actor and musician Idris Elba along with his wife Sabrina Elba and British Vogue's Edward Enninful have all signed the petition which calls on President Nana Akufo-Addo to "reach out and engage in a meaningful and purposeful dialogue with the LGBTQIA+ community leaders to create a pathway for allyship, protection and support." The petition has also been backed by UK Black Pride.

The petition also addresses the LGBT community directly with words of encouragement saying, "Even though at present you might be feeling alone and cornered, we want to assure you that we are here." The petition adds, "We are watching and listening and we will use our collective power to shield and raise you up."

Homosexuality remains illegal in Ghana as is the case in several other African countries. While there have been very few instances of prosecution and imprisonment, members of the LGBT community continue to face targeted harassment, assault and marginalisation.

Read the rest of the petition below:

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Here's What You Need To Know About The Political Unrest In Sudan

Thousands have been protesting the Sudanese government over the weekend, supporting the military's plans for a coup.

Sudan's transitional government is in turmoil as thousands of citizens conducted a sit-in protest against them, over the weekend. A group of Sudanese citizens have called on the military to disestablish the nation's current government, as the country struggles with the greatest crisis they've seen since the end of former dictator Omar al-Bashir's controversial ruling, two years ago. The weekend's pro-military protests come as anti-military protestors took to the streets earlier this month to fight for civilian-ruled laws.

Military-aligned demonstrators assembled outside of the famously off-limits entrance of the Presidential Palace located in the Sudanese capital, Khartoum on Monday. Gatherers set up tents, blocking off access to two main intersections, cutting off access to the capital for those inside. Police attempted to wave off crowds with teargas, with Khartoum state officials saying they had, "repelled an attempted assault on the seat of government," in a statement issued Monday.

The assembly was called for by a coalition of rebel groups and political parties that support Sudan's military, accusing the civilian political parties of mismanagement and monopolizing power under their ruling. Demonstrations began on Saturday, but Sunday's gathering saw a lower attendance. According to Reuters, by Monday afternoon, thousands, between 2,000 - 3,000, had returned to voice their concerns. 52-year-old tribal elder Tahar Fadl al-Mawla spoke at the helm of the sit-in outside of the Presidential palace saying, "The civilian government has failed. We want a government of soldiers to protect the transition." Alongside a 65-year-old Ahman Jumaa who claimed to have traveled more than 900 kilometers (570 miles) from Southern region Nyala to show his support.

Protesters are demanding the appointment of a new cabinet that is "more representative of the people who participated in the December 2019 revolution that eventually led to the ousting of former president Omar al-Bashir", Al Jazeera reported from Sudan. Protesters headed towards the Presidential Palace, where an emergency cabinet meeting was being held when they were met by police forces.

Pro-civilian political parties have plans for their own demonstration on Thursday, the anniversary of the 1964 revolution that overthrew Sudan's first military regime under Ibrahim Abboud and brought in a period of democracy that the country still struggles to uphold.


Sudanese Twitter users shared their thoughts online, with many drawing similarities between the current unrest and other political crises the nation has faced.


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