Listen to Nasty C’s New Song ‘Zulu Man’

Nasty C showcases IsiZulu bars in new song 'Zulu Man'.

For years in his flourishing career, fans, especially those from his city Durban, have been urging Nasty C to rap in his home language IsiZulu.

However, the rapper, whose English raps can go bar for bar with the best in the world, has taken his own time. He recently stated he's not under pressure to sound more (South) African in his raps.


In "Zulu Man", the rapper rides a cloud of dark synths and a pulverising bassline as he delivers two verses purely in IsiZulu. He tells his story of getting into rap, how he's an inspiration to the youngins from his hood. He even mentions his neighbours' names who he says can testify that he's been about this rap life his whole life. How's that for homage?

While Nasty C's Zulu rapping isn't top of the range, he still sounds convincing and believable. And he manages to use the incumbent triplet flow while rapping in IsiZulu. Some lines fall out of pocket, but "Zulu Man" does succeed in showing Nasty C in a different light. As the rapper always says, he mostly speaks IsiZulu when he's with friends and family—so this is a chance to meet the man he is to those who are close to him.

"Zulu Man" is the fifth song to be released from Nasty C's highly anticipated third studio album Zulu Man With Some Power. The previous four singles "Eazy", "There They Go", "Palm Trees and "They Don't" which features T.I have all (except the latter) been treated to world-class visuals from the artist who's on the verge of international dominance.

Stream "Zulu Man" on Apple Music and Spotify.


Zulu Man www.youtube.com

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(Photo by Gareth Cattermole/Getty Images)

The 10 Best HHP Songs Ranked

On the second anniversary of HHP's passing, we rank 10 of the South African hip-hop legend's best songs.

Jabulani Tsambo, popularly known by his alias HHP, was a pivotal part of South African hip-hop. Renowned for trailblazing the motswako sub-genre in the early 2000s, the rapper sadly passed away on October 24th, 2018 after a long and much publicised bout with depression.

During his active years, which span two decades (from 1997 to 2018), he was instrumental in breaking barriers and bridging the gap between kwaito and hip-hop in SA, from the late 90s to early 2000s.

He became a household name in the 2000s as he spearheaded the motswako movement, propelling it to the mainstream and solidifying his legendary status in the process.

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