Events

Davido, Wizkid, Stonebwoy & More Headline The All-Star ‘One Africa Music Fest' Concert

Definitely a summer concert not to miss, One Africa Music Fest will be hosted by Banky W at Barclays Center in New York.

High-profile artists hailing from the continent, “One Dance” rapper Wizkid, Nigerian pop star Davido, and Ghanaian dancehall performer Stonebwoy, are joining ranks for One Africa Music Fest on July 22.


Also slated to grace the stage are Tanzania’s superstar Diamond Platnumz and Nigeria’s hottest singers Flavour, Iyanya and Tiwa Savage.

It’s rumored Wizkid’s StarBoy WorldWide Records signees Ghanaian hip-hop duo R2Bees and Mr. Eazi may perform as well, according to Ghana Web.

Has your head exploded yet with this incredible and unprecedented lineup?

Definitely a summer concert not to miss, One Africa Music Fest will be hosted by Banky W at Barclays Center in New York.

Hurry to snag tix here and also catch more of Davido this summer, performing with NYC’s biggest afrobeat ensemble Antibalas at Okayafrica’s Afrobeat x Afrobeats.

Okayafrica is giving 3 winners a chance to win a pair of tickets to attend One Africa Music Fest! Enter here for a chance to win. Winners will be picked by 5 p.m. EST!

Can't make it to One Africa Fest in Brooklyn? Watch the stars live on the official livestream brought to you by TIDAL and Okayafrica. Tune in tomorrow Friday, July 22nd at 7:30pm EST.

Flier courtesy of One Africa Music Fest

Music
Photo by Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Hugh Masekela's New York City Legacy

A look back at the South African legend's time in New York City and his enduring presence in the Big Apple.

In Questlove's magnificent documentary, Summer of Soul, he captures a forgotten part of Black American music history. But in telling the tale of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, the longtime musician and first-time filmmaker also captures a part of lost South African music history too.

Among the line-up of blossoming all-stars who played the Harlem festival, from a 19-year-old Stevie Wonder to a transcendent Mavis Staples, was a young Hugh Masekela. 30 years old at the time, he was riding the wave of success that came from releasing Grazing in the Grass the year before. To watch Masekela in that moment on that stage is to see him at the height of his time in New York City — a firecracker musician who entertained his audiences as much as he educated them about the political situation in his home country of South Africa.

The legacy Masekela sowed in New York City during the 1960s remains in the walls of the venues where he played, and in the dust of those that are no longer standing. It's in the records he made in studios and jazz clubs, and on the Manhattan streets where he once posed with a giant stuffed zebra for an album cover. It's a legacy that still lives on in tangible form, too, in the Hugh Masekela Heritage Scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music.

The school is the place where Masekela received his education and met some of the people that would go on to be life-long bandmates and friends, from Larry Willis (who, as the story goes, Masekela convinced to give up opera for piano) to Morris Goldberg, Herbie Hancock and Stewart Levine, "his brother and musical compadre," as Mabusha Masekela, Bra Hugh's nephew says.

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