News Brief

South African Black Twitter is Freaking Out Over the Upcoming Elections

#IWantToVoteBut is highlighting the concerns South Africans have with regards to casting their votes in the upcoming elections.

In just two days, on the 8th May, South Africans will be heading to the polls to cast their vote in what has been described as one of the most fiercely contested elections the country has faced in years. However, with very little time left to decide on just who exactly they'll be voting for, South African Black Twitter is not only undecided but also distressed about the upcoming elections.


While South Africans living abroad cast their votes almost a week ago, those living within the country are left with a little under two days to do the same. However, uncertain, fearful and even defeatist sentiments are all evident online as Black South Africans are revealing their personal challenges to voting.

READ: South Africa is Tackling Fake News Head-on Ahead of May Elections

Some South Africans have highlighted how voting has not tangibly changed the lives of their families—many of whom have been voting for years. Despite their believing that their vote would change their plight, the opposite has been true.

Others have highlighted how none of the three major political parties have addressed the alarmingly high rates of unemployment particularly among the youth.


The ruling African National Congress (ANC) has been plagued by rampant corruption since former President Jacob Zuma's tenure and many have lost faith in the political party.

Although the popularity of the radical Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) has increased of late, there are a number of South Africans that doubt whether their unorthodox and hypocritical ways will translate into an effective government.

On the other hand, the Democratic Alliance (DA) is still being heavily critiqued for its lackluster attempts to address racial inequality.

READ: South African Youth on 2019 Elections: "The ANC can no longer self-correct"

Here are some more #IWantToVoteBut tweets below:





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