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Photo by Siyabonga Mkhasibe.

This South African Photographer is Exhibiting His Work At a Taxi Rank

Kgomotso Neto is bringing his photo-based street art to one of Johannesburg's busiest taxi ranks.

South Africans know the daily hustle and bustle that happens at taxi ranks. People are trying to get around the city as quickly as they can and they don't have time for much else. Twenty-nine-year-old Johannesburg-based photographer Kgomotso Neto is slowly changing that narrative. He's put up his latest photo exhibition at Bree taxi rank—arguably the busiest taxi rank in Johannesburg. The aim is to make art more accessible and bring it into spaces where people spend a lot of their time.

We caught up with him to learn a little more about his craft and what inspired his recent exhibition.


What were the beginnings of your journey as a photographer?

My beginnings were filled with a lot of uncertainty, not knowing where this whole photography thing will end up. There was a lot of learning as I kept shooting. The more I got into photography, the more I was affirmed that this is what I should be doing. There's just been a few things that happened that made me confident enough to go full-time into photography.

What inspires the images you capture?

The need to be something in this world, especially as a person of color. Creating work that's intentionally for Black people is what keeps me going. I'm the type that creates when I feel there's a need to or I feel inspired to do so. Inspiration comes in different forms and from different places. I always have ideas which I think are radical but it's never easy to execute. I rely a lot on my gut feeling, so whatever feels good I go for it.

Why was getting your images up at the Bree taxi rank important for you?

It was to make the work accessible to people who can identify or resonate with it. That specific work is about the intercity and the taxi industry. It only made sense to put it up in the space that gave birth to that whole project.

View Neto's photos below:

Photo by Kgomotso Neto.


Photo by Kgomotso Neto.



Photo by Kgomotso Neto.


Photo by Khotso Mahlangu



Photo by Kgomotso Neto.


Photo by Khotso Mahlangu.

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Photo: Alvin Ukpeh.

The Year Is 2020 & the Future of Nigeria Is the Youth

We discuss the strength in resolve of Nigeria's youth, their use of social media to speak up, and the young digital platforms circumventing the legacy media propaganda machine. We also get first-hand accounts from young creatives on being extorted by SARS and why they believe the protests are so important.

In the midst of a pandemic-rife 2020, the voices of African youth have gotten louder in demand for a better present and future. From structural reforms, women's rights, LGBTQ rights, and derelict states of public service, the youths have amplified their voices via the internet and social media, to cohesively express grievances that would hitherto have been quelled at a whisper.

Nigerian youth have used the internet and social media to create and sustain a loud voice for themselves. The expression of frustration and the calls for change may have started online, but it's having a profound effect on the lives of every Nigerian with each passing day. What started as the twitter hashtag #EndSARS has grown into a nationwide youth revolution led by the people.

Even after the government supposedly disbanded the SARS (Special Anti-Robbery Squad) unit on the 10th of October, young Nigerians have not relented in their demands for better policing. The lack of trust for government promises has kept the youth protesting on the streets and online.

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