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Watch Bernadine Evaristo Talk About Womanhood and Othering on 'BBC: Focus on Africa'

The 2019 Booker Prize winner speaks to BBC about her acclaimed book 'Girl, Woman, Other'.

Earlier this week, British-Nigerian author Bernadine Evaristo was awarded the prestigious Booker Prize for her book, Girl, Woman, Other. Although the Booker Prize forbids that the award be given to more than one individual, the committee reportedly felt that two novels were deserving of this year's prize. While Evaristo made history as the first ever Black woman to win the prize, many were not pleased that she had to share the prize with Canadian author, Margaret Atwood. Recently, in an interview with BBC: Focus on Africa, Evaristo spoke about womanhood, othering in terms of race, sexuality, class and immigration status.

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Boity and Dee Koala Totally Own ‘Utatakho Remix’

Boity and Dee Koala deliver great verses on "Utatakho Remix."

One of the most anticipated songs of the year was the remix to "Utatakho" by Yanga Chief. It's the combination of rappers enlisted on the song and of course the fact that the original is a heater that raised everyone's curiosity.

Riky Rick takes the opening verse, and drops decent bars, but things start taking a different turn from Dee Koala's verse. The Cape Town emcee frolics over the beat, switching flows, aligning her bars perfectly with the instrumental. She shows love to her city and reminds you she's great.

In her verse, Boity opens about her personal issues with her father: "Personally, this is a touchy subject/ 'Cause my dad was live but his presence wasn't/ So my mama was everything daddy wasn't," and goes on to say she holds no grudge towards her father, and refusing to dwell on that, she chooses to be grateful for her present life.

One thing is clear, Boity can rap. Her verse on this remix is seamlessly delivered in both English and Setswana. Every word she utters sounds believable. She has been consistently dope since she released her first song last year, "Wuz Dat."

"Utatakho Remix" is the closing song on Yanga Chief's recently released EP Becoming a Pop Star. The nine-track project includes the original version of "Utatakho" and the song "200," which was released last week. Apart from the guests on the remix, features on BAPS include AKA and Makwa.

Listen to Becoming a Pop Star below:



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Image courtesy of Ley Uwera.

What’s in a Photo? We Go Behind the Lens With Congolese Photographer Ley Uwera

Ley Uwera gives us the backstory on some of the most riveting images she's taken of life in DR Congo.

Ley Uwera has a gift.

With a single flash of a camera, the radio reporter turned photojournalist has the ability to tell stories that both preserve and shift the narrative of what it means to be Congolese; specifically life in Eastern Congo, wrought with misleading tropes and stereotypes perpetuated by a Western lens.

A graduate of the Université de Cipromad in Goma, Uwera always knew she wanted to find a career that married her passion for creativity and her interest in humanity. In her fifth year of photojournalism, she has curated a body of work that captures the soul of her people beautifully. And sometimes, painfully. It's storytelling, she explained to OkayAfrica, and it's necessary in order to see the full picture.

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Image courtesy of Bose Ogulu

The Internet Doesn't Know Mama Burna At All

She might be your favorite internet auntie, but Bose Ogulu is a woman and a professional in full.

At the top of the year, Bose Ogulu—the mother and manager of one of Nigeria's biggest Afro-fusion stars—won the internet with three simple words: "Expect more madness."

She uttered those words into the mic at the 2018 Soundcity Music Awards (broadcast live on Jan. 5, 2019), where she accepted the biggest accolade of the night on behalf of her son, Burna Boy. The response on Twitter was swift; tweets praising the artist's badass mother for her youthful energy populated the social media platform immediately after she confidently strolled off the stage.

"Burna Boy's mom be shaking tables and chairs—in fact all furnitures [sic]," wrote one Twitter user. "Burna Boy's mom is the real MVP!!! Now we know where he got it from," wrote another. Her unapologetic delivery at the awards show, followed by another widely shared clip showing Ogulu warmly embracing her son (while he holds what appears to be a joint), quickly earned her the title of the "cool mom" amongst young Nigerian social media users. Fans had yet another reason to tweet out their admiration for a woman they dubbed Mama Burna. She's fun like a sister. She's familiar like an auntie. She loves fiercely like a mother. It seems, according to internet praise, we have her pegged. She's Burna Boy's mom, and many who have watched her boost her son's career have only seen her through this singular lens.

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To the Girls With Heavy Names

Oronike Odeleye's name isn't just a direct line to the continent. It's the blueprint for how she lives her life and the reason she spends her time protecting Black women and girls.

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