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Tunisian Women March Against Gender-Based Violence Under the #EnaZeda Movement

The march comes after a newly-elected politician was allegedly seen on video masturbating outside of a school.

This past Saturday, hundreds of Tunisian women took to the streets of Tunis in protest against gender-based violence in the country, according to the BBC. Under the banner of #EnaZeda, the Arabic translation of the #MeToo movement, the women urged the government to exercise political will in ending violence against women and carried brooms to symbolize the "sweeping away" of gender-based violence. The march comes after a video and images emerged which allegedly showed the newly-elected member of parliament, Zouheir Makhlouf, masturbating outside of a school in October.


Saturday's march was reportedly organized by at least 50 local NGOs including the Tunisian Association of Democratic Women (ATFD). Although Makhlouf has since denied the allegations against him citing that he was urinating in a bottle as a result of his diabetic condition, the #EnaZeda movement has grown in numbers and allowed Tunisian women to share their personal experiences and accounts of having survived being abused while challenging so-called taboos online.



In July of 2017, Tunisia passed its first national law to end violence against women—a historic moment for Tunisian women. Naziha Labidi, the Minister of Women, Family and Childhood commented on the law saying that, "As a Tunisian woman, I am very proud that this law has been adopted. This is the climax of the steps that began through the adoption of the Code of Personal Status in 1956."

Additionally, numerous accounts of children being sexually harassed by family members continue to emerge. The Jerusalem Post reports that lawyer Fadoua Brahem points out that the country's nonchalant culture with regards to addressing child abuse is part of the problem. "In Tunisia, the sanctity of a child's body is not respected," Brahem says. She adds that, "A victim needs to have the psychological and financial tools to seek justice–it's not set up to be available to everyone."

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CNN Names Ethiopian Innovator Freweini Mebrahtu This Year's 'Hero of the Year'

Freweini Mebrahtu designed a reusable sanitary pad to help keep girls in school and has fought to end the cultural stigma around menstruation.

Last night, Ethiopia's Freweini Mebrahtu was been named CNN's "Hero of the Year". The award was in recognition of her work on menstruation and keeping girls in school as well as fighting to end the cultural stigma still attached to menstruation. Mebrahtu was also awarded USD 100 000 to help in expanding her work.

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'Chalk Back' Sees Kenyan Women Fighting Back Against Street Sexual Harassment

Kenyan women and girls in Kibera are using chalk to literally document their experiences with sexual harassment on the very streets they've been harassed.

Kenyan women and girls living in Kibera, one of the largest informal settlements on the continent, are fed up with being sexually harassed daily on the streets by men.

In a campaign dubbed "Chalk Back", women and young girls are using chalk to document their experiences with sexual harassment on the same streets they've been harassed, according to the BBC.

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Veteran Somali Musician Ahmed Ismail Hussein Has Died

Considered one of the founding fathers of contemporary Somali music and affectionately known as 'Hudeydi', the musician has passed away from the coronavirus at age 92.

Veteran Somali musician Ahmed Ismail Hussein has passed away at the age of 92 according to reports by the BBC.

Considered one of the founding fathers of contemporary Somali music, the musician passed away in London, England, after having tested positive for the coronavirus.

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(Photo Illustration by Rafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)

Rejoice! WhatsApp Places New Restrictions on Chain Messages to Fight Fake News

To combat the spread of misinformation due to the coronavirus outbreak, users are now restricted from sharing frequently forwarded messages to more than one person.

The rise of the novel coronavirus has seen an increase in the spread of fake news across social media sites and platforms, particularly WhatsApp—a platform known as a hotbed for the forwarding of illegitimate chain messages and conspiracy theories (if you have African parents, you're probably familiar). Now the Facebook-owned app is setting in place new measures to try and curb the spread of fake news on its platform.

The app is putting new restrictions on message forwarding which will limit the number of times a frequently forwarded message can be shared. Messages that have been sent through a chain of more than five people can only subsequently be forwarded to one person. "We know many users forward helpful information, as well as funny videos, memes, and reflections or prayers they find meaningful," announced the app in a blog post on Tuesday. "In recent weeks, people have also used WhatsApp to organize public moments of support for frontline health workers."

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