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Tunisian Women March Against Gender-Based Violence Under the #EnaZeda Movement

The march comes after a newly-elected politician was allegedly seen on video masturbating outside of a school.

This past Saturday, hundreds of Tunisian women took to the streets of Tunis in protest against gender-based violence in the country, according to the BBC. Under the banner of #EnaZeda, the Arabic translation of the #MeToo movement, the women urged the government to exercise political will in ending violence against women and carried brooms to symbolize the "sweeping away" of gender-based violence. The march comes after a video and images emerged which allegedly showed the newly-elected member of parliament, Zouheir Makhlouf, masturbating outside of a school in October.


Saturday's march was reportedly organized by at least 50 local NGOs including the Tunisian Association of Democratic Women (ATFD). Although Makhlouf has since denied the allegations against him citing that he was urinating in a bottle as a result of his diabetic condition, the #EnaZeda movement has grown in numbers and allowed Tunisian women to share their personal experiences and accounts of having survived being abused while challenging so-called taboos online.



In July of 2017, Tunisia passed its first national law to end violence against women—a historic moment for Tunisian women. Naziha Labidi, the Minister of Women, Family and Childhood commented on the law saying that, "As a Tunisian woman, I am very proud that this law has been adopted. This is the climax of the steps that began through the adoption of the Code of Personal Status in 1956."

Additionally, numerous accounts of children being sexually harassed by family members continue to emerge. The Jerusalem Post reports that lawyer Fadoua Brahem points out that the country's nonchalant culture with regards to addressing child abuse is part of the problem. "In Tunisia, the sanctity of a child's body is not respected," Brahem says. She adds that, "A victim needs to have the psychological and financial tools to seek justice–it's not set up to be available to everyone."

Music

6 Samples From 'Éthiopiques' in Hip-Hop

A brief history of Ethio-jazz cultural exchange featuring songs by Nas & Damian Marley, K'naan, Madlib and more.

This article was originally published on OkayAfrica in March, 2017. We're republishing it here for our Crossroads series.

It's 2000 something. I'm holed up in my bedroom searching for samples to chop up on Fruity Loops. While deep into the free-market jungle of Amazon's suggested music section, I stumble across a compilation of Ethiopian music with faded pictures of nine guys jamming in white suit jackets. I press play on the 30 second sample.

My mind races with the opportunities these breakbeats offered a budding beat maker. Catchy organs, swinging horns, funky guitar riffs, soulful melodies and grainy and pained vocalists swoon over love lost and gained. Sung in my mother tongue—Amharic—this was a far cry from the corny synthesizer music of the 1990s that my parents played on Saturday mornings. I could actually sample this shit.

The next day, I burn a CD and pop it into my dad's car. His eyes light up when the first notes ooze out of the speakers. “Where did you get this?" He asks puzzlingly. “The internet," I respond smiling.

In the 1970s my dad was one of thousands of high school students in Addis Ababa protesting the monarchy. The protests eventually created instability which lead to a coup d'état. The monarchy was overthrown and a Marxist styled military junta composed of low ranking officers called the Derg came to power. The new regime subsequently banned music they deemed to be counter revolutionary. When the Derg came into power, Amha Eshete, a pioneering record producer and founder of Ahma Records, fled to the US and the master recordings of his label's tracks somehow ended up in a warehouse in Greece.

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