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#JusticeForTshegoPule: Man Charged With Murder of 28-Year-Old Woman in South Africa

As the nation contends with Black people dying at the hands of the police, femicide continues to claim the lives of South African women including 28-year-old Tshego Pule.

UPDATE: 6/17: A man has been charged with the murder of 28-year-old Tshego Pule, whose body was found hanging from a tree last week in Johannesburg, South Africa after she went missing on June 4. The gruesome murder reignited protests around rampant femicide in the country.

According to BBC Africa, 31 year-old Mzikayise Malephane, appeared in court on Wednesday and has been charged with pre-meditated murder. The case is slated to move forward on June 24. Authorities believe that others may have been involved in the murder and have urged the public to assist in the investigation.

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South African women continue to live in fear as gender-based violence and femicide persist alongside the COVID-19 pandemic. Recently, 28-year-old Tshego Pule, was found hanging from a tree with stab wounds to her chest after having gone missing at the beginning of June, according to the Gauteng Department of Social Development. Pule was also reportedly heavily pregnant at the time of her death.


READ: Investigation Launches Into Death of LGBT Sex Worker in Police Custody

Social media has erupted into #JusticeForTshegoPule with reactions to not only the young woman's death, the deaths of countless women before her.

Last year, hundreds of South African women marched against gender-based violence and demanded that it could not be "business as usual." The protests came in the wake of numerous deaths of young South African women at the hands of men. While President Cyril Ramaphosa and his government established various task forces and assured protesters that crimes against women would be dealt with the full might of the law, very little has come from those assurances.

Although South Africa's femicide rate is five-times that of the global average, the government continues to lack the political will required to take action.

And while South Africa undeniably leads the way in terms of violence against women, Nigerians are also fed up. The recent online movement #WeAreTired saw Nigerians demanding that the government take fierce action against gender-based and police violence in the country, following a string of violent cases against young women. The online protests came shortly after the death of 23-year-old student Vera Omozuwa.

Here are some reactions to #JusticeForTshegoPule below:





Interview

Kofi Jamar Switches Lanes In 'Appetite for Destruction'

The Ghanaian rapper and "Ekorso" hitmaker presents a different sound in his latest EP.

The drill scene in Ghana has been making waves across the continent for some time now. If you're hip to what a crop of young and hungry artists from the city of Kumasi in Ghana and beyond have been doing over the past year, then you already know about rapper Kofi Jamar.

Towards the end of November last year he dropped one of the biggest drill songs to emerge from Ghana's buzzing drill scene, the popular street anthem "Ekorso." In the December and January that followed, "Ekorso" was the song on everyone's lips, the hip-hop song that took over the season, with even the likes of Wizkid spotted vibing to the tune.

Currently sitting at over 10 million streams across digital streaming platforms, the song topped charts, even breaking records in the process. "Ekorso" maintained the number one spot on Apple Music's Hip-Hop/Rap: Ghana chart for two months uninterrupted, a first in the history of the chart. It also had a good stint at number one of the Ghana Top 100 chart as well, among several other accolades.

Even though he's the creator of what could be the biggest song of Ghana's drill movement till date, Kofi Jamar doesn't plan on replicating his past music or his past moves. He has just issued his second EP, a 6-track project titled Appetite for Destruction, and it would surprise you to know that there isn't a single drill song on it. Although drill played a huge role in his meteoric rise, he wants to be known as way more than just a drill rapper. He wants to be known as a complete and versatile artist, unafraid to engage in any genre — and he even looks forward to creating his own genre of music during the course of his career.

We spoke to Kofi Jamar about his latest EP, and he tells us about working with Teni, why he's gravitating away from drill to a new sound, and more. Check out our conversation below.

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Music

Listen to Tems' New EP 'If Orange Was A Place'

The buzzing Nigerian is also announcing her signing to Since '93/RCA Records and her placement as Apple Music's Up Next artist.

Tems is striking while the iron's hot and sharing her new 5-song EP, If Orange Was A Place.

The new release comes a few days after she dropped its lead single, "Crazy Tings," an addictive and bounce-heavy track produced by Ghanaian beatmaker GuiltyBeatz.

If Orange Was A Place also features a single guest appearance from American singer Brent Faiyaz — who lends his vocals to "Found" — and production from Jonah Christian. It was mixed and mastered by Spax.

The new EP comes alongside the news that Tems has signed to Since '93/RCA Records and been announced as Apple Music's latest Up Next artist.

Tems has been a highly-buzzing name in the last month with her feature on Drake's Certified Lover Boy, in which she appears on the song "Fountains," and for the massive popularity of her single alongside Wizkid, "Essence," which recently got a Justin Bieber remix.

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Interview

Liya Wants to Stand Out

The rising Nigerian artist, who has been crowned the 'First Lady' of Davido's DMW label, tells us about how her life has changed and details her new Alari EP.

When Nigerian music icon Davido signed Liya, a day after hearing her song in a Lagos nightclub, the trajectory of her life was effectively changed. From being a hopeful up-and-comer, the singer was suddenly on the books of one of the most influential record labels in the afropop industry, Davido Music Worldwide, and primed for a breakthrough. "Melo," the enthralling single played that day in the club was released within days of Liya's signing, retro-fitted with a video that heralded her ascension to the 30 Billion Gang.

Following the buzz and positive acceptance of "Melo," Liya retreated to the shadows to deal with the evolving landscape of her life and put together a debut project that would cement her position within Nigerian pop. In August, nine months after being signed, Liya returned with Alari, a six-track EP that was released without a lead single.

"Alari is basically saying I am different," the singer says during a chat one afternoon after the project's release. Songs like "Odua" and the project's titular track prove that the Liya is effectively operating on her own plain, where she weaves desire and equanimous gratitude into languid, fluid pop anthems guided by her sirenic voice and breathless cadences.

Below, we caught up with Liya to discuss working on Alari, getting signed to DMW, and the inner workings of her life.

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