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All photos courtesy of Remi Dada

Afropreneurs: Meet the Designer Reinventing Nigerian Workspaces

Remi Dada's Spacefinish is shaking up design to create futuristic work environments for African companies

In the digital age when a fancy rectangle in our pockets can find us whatever we want, customize it and deliver it to our door, it's odd that the same thought process isn't also applied to physical space. Why does every parking lot feel exactly the same? Can waiting rooms be designed to make time pass more quickly? How can we bring these new standards of personalization into the areas where we live our lives?

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Meet the Women Behind Tunisia's New All-Female DJ Academy

We go to Tunis to see how women are making sure there's a place for them behind the decks.

There's a party at the ambassador's residence. People are schmoozing with drinks in hand and head bopping to electronic music. DJ Alpha, who plays a mix of Afro, pop and deep house, is on the decks with dark nail polish and a studded leather jacket. Next to her are three young women intently watching her hands and nodding their heads. I wonder if they feel the same inspiration I felt when I looked at her.

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Music
Maurice Louca Photo: Alexander Mahmoud

Meet the Vanguard of Contemporary Egyptian Jazz

We talk to Egyptian jazz musician Maurice Louca on his new album, Elephantine

The French composer Claude Debussy once famously said "Music is the space between the notes." Decades later, jazz great Miles Davis echoed this sentiment by saying "It's not the notes you play, it's the notes you don't play."

For Maurice Louca, a musician based in Cairo, the concept of the space between the notes–the absence of sound and how he plays with it–has been an integral part of his life and musical progression. Louca is releasing his latest work, Elephantine, on February first. He says it is his "most ambitious work yet." In it, Louca (who plays guitar and piano) leads a 12-piece ensemble through a swirling, hypnotic jumble of cosmic jazz that has a feeling of perpetual motion. Think Kamasi Washington if he had grown up listening to mesmerizing Yemeni chants and Egyptian shaabi pop.

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Culture
Image via UGood's Instagram

The Ugandan Chef Introducing the Rolex to the World​

How the beloved food from the streets of Kampala made its international entrance in an unlikely place.

Chapatis, eggs and vegetables—these are the three humble ingredients needed to make Uganda's ubiquitous snack food, the Rolex. A play of words on 'rolled eggs,'—no relation to the watch— the Rolex is said to be traced back to a single chapati-maker in the eastern town of Busoga but it gained popularity at Makerere University in Kampala. No wonder the students loved it; it's fast, cheap and delicious. The Rolex is now found all over the country and there's even a Rolex festival, which celebrated its third year this August. This year the festival drew chefs from Kenya, Mexico and India who wanted to show off their take on the dish. Safe to say, this poor man's snack has morphed into a source of national pride.

Unlike other country's national dishes, it can be hard to find abroad. The one exception is in the tiny country of Denmark where in 2015, Sylvester Bbaale opened UGood—the world's first Rolex joint outside Uganda. He even has an award from the King of Buganda certifying it.

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