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Stop What You're Doing Right Now and Watch Falz's New Video 'This Is Nigeria'

The Nigerian rapper tackles his country's social ills in his very own answer to Childish Gambino's "This Is America."

Nigerian rapper, Falz has been known to use his sharp brand of humor to address social ills in his country. Today he's taken it a step further with the release of a new song and video entitled "This is Nigeria" and the outcome is an audacious, decidedly necessary critique of Nigerian society inspired by Childish Gambino's viral video "This is America."

Falz opens the song with a voice over of his father the lawyer and human rights activist, Femi Falana, discussing the consequences of rampant corruption and exploitation, before adding his own cutting criticism: "This is Nigeria, look how I'm living now, look how I'm living now. Everybody be criminal," he rhymes as chaos ensues all around him.

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Listen to Adekunle Gold's New Album 'About 30'

Adekunle Gold's highly-anticipated sophomore album is here.

Adekunle Gold's much-anticipated sophomore album, About 30, has arrived.

The 14-track album boasts features from Seun Kuti, Flavor and British-Nigerian soul singer Jacob Banks, who appears on a remix to the popular lead single "Ire." The album sees the artist flexing immense versatility and range as he delivers emotional ballads, folk-Inspired cuts sung in Yoruba, and a few highlife-tinged summer jams.

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This Sudanese Cartoonist Created the Viral Colin Kaepernick Civil Rights Image

Khalid Albaih's work has become a symbol of protest against social injustices and the NFL's discriminatory policies.

As the NFL continues to encroach upon the civil rights of its players by presenting new policies that could penalize them for kneeling during the National Anthem, those in support of the protest continue to express their support for Colin Kaepernick, who sparked the movement within the NFL when he boldly knelt during the National Anthem in 2016.

He's drawn several comparisons to Civil Rights-era athletes like Muhammad Ali as well as Tommie Smith and John Carlos who iconically put up the black power salute during the 1968 Olympic games. One Sudanese artist decided to translate Kaepernick's activism into a cartoon, which has been worn on shirts by members of the NCAAP in order to lead protests, and by Chance the Rapper.

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