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Lupita Nyong'o, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Wizkid & More Bag NAACP Image Awards

Check out the full list of winners for this year's NAACP Image Awards.

The 51st NAACP Image Awards were held this past Saturday in Pasadena, California.

Naturally, the awards show pulled through and finally gave our fave Black performers the recognition they deserve for their outstanding performances last year.


Lupita Nyong'o bagged two NAACP Image awards including "Outstanding Actress in a Motion Picture" for her epic role in the Jordan Peele-horror flick Us and "Outstanding Literary Work—Children" for her debut children's book titled Sulwe. The book was released last year and has added to the necessary conversation around colorism and exclusion in the Black community.

Chiwetel Ejiofor walked away with the award for "Outstanding Directing in a Motion Picture" for the Netflix Original Film The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind. Check out Ejiofor's interview with OkayAfrica CEO Abiola Oke below:

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Beyoncé''s The Lion King: The Gift album which featured numerous African artists including Tiwa Savage, Mr Eazi, Burna Boy, Anatii, Busiswa, Moonchild Sanelly, Yemi Alade, Tekno and several others, took home the award for "Outstanding Soundtrack/Compilation Album". Notably, the wildly successful album also scored a win at the prestigious Soul Train Awards last year and earned a nod at the 62nd Grammys.

"Brown Skin Girl", the track that featured Beyoncé, Wizkid, Blue Ivy Carter and Saint Jhn, went on to bag the award for "Outstanding Duo, Group or Collaboration". The feel-good song became one of last year's biggest anthems for dark-skinned girls all over the world and resulted in a number of impressive covers by the likes of Stormzy and several other artists.

Check out the full list of winners of the 2020 NAACP Image Awards below:


Overall

Entertainer of the Year: Lizzo

Motion Pictures

Outstanding Motion Picture: "Just Mercy"

Outstanding Actor in a Motion Picture: Michael B. Jordan, "Just Mercy"

Outstanding Actress in a Motion Picture: Lupita Nyong'o, "Us"

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Motion Picture: Jamie Foxx, "Just Mercy"

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Motion Picture: Marsai Martin, "Little"

Outstanding Breakthrough Performance in a Motion Picture: Marsai Martin, "Little"

Outstanding Ensemble Cast in a Motion Picture: "Just Mercy"

Outstanding Independent Motion Picture: "Dolemite Is My Name"

Television

Outstanding Comedy Series: "Black-ish"

Outstanding Actor in a Comedy Series: Anthony Anderson, "Black-ish"

Outstanding Actress in a Comedy Series: Tracee Ellis Ross, "Black-ish"

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series: Deon Cole, "Black-ish"

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series: Marsai Martin, "Black-ish"

Outstanding Drama Series: "Greenleaf"

Outstanding Actor in a Drama Series: Omari Hardwick, "Power"

Outstanding Actress in a Drama Series: Angela Bassett, "9-1-1"

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series: Harold Perrineau, "Claws"

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series: Lynn Whitfield, "Greenleaf"

Outstanding Television Movie, Limited Series or Dramatic Special: "When They See Us"

Outstanding Actor in a Television Movie, Limited Series or Dramatic Special: Jharrel Jerome, "When They See Us"

Outstanding Actress in a Television Movie, Limited–Series or Dramatic Special: Niecy Nash, "When They See Us"

Outstanding News/Information (Series or Special): "Unsung"

Outstanding Talk Series: "Red Table Talk"

Outstanding Reality Program, Reality Competition or Game Show: "Rhythm + Flow"

Outstanding Variety Show (Series or Special): "Homecoming: A Film by Beyoncé"

Outstanding Children's Program: "Family Reunion"

Outstanding Performance by a Youth (Series, Special, Television Movie or Limited–series): Marsai Martin, "Black-ish"

Outstanding Host in a Talk or News/Information (Series or Special) – Individual or Ensemble: Jada Pinkett Smith, "Red Table Talk"

Outstanding Host in a Reality/Reality Competition, Game Show or Variety (Series or Special) – Individual or Ensemble: Steve Harvey, "Celebrity Family Feud"

Outstanding Guest Performance in a Comedy or Drama Series: Kelly Rowland, "American Soul"

Recording

Outstanding Album: "Homecoming: The Live Album," Beyoncé

Outstanding New Artist: Lil Nas X

Outstanding Male Artist: Bruno Mars

Outstanding Female Artist: Beyoncé

Outstanding Song – Traditional: "Spirit," Beyoncé

Outstanding Song – Contemporary: "Before I Let Go," Beyoncé

Outstanding Duo, Group or Collaboration: "Brown Skin Girl" Blue Ivy, SAINt JHN, Beyoncé and WizKiD

Outstanding Jazz Album: "Love & Liberation," Jazzmeia Horn

Outstanding Gospel/Christian Song (Traditional or Contemporary): "Love Theory," Kirk Franklin

Outstanding Music Video/Visual Album: "Juice," Lizzo

Outstanding Soundtrack/Compilation Album: "The Lion King: The Gift," Beyoncé with Various Artists

Literature

Outstanding Literary Work – Fiction: "The Revisioners," Margaret Wilkerson Sexton

Outstanding Literary Work – Nonfiction: "The Source of Self-Regard: Selected Essays, Speeches, and Meditations," Toni Morrison

Outstanding Literary Work – Debut Author: "I Am Dance: Words and Images of the Black Dancer," Hal Banfield (Author), Javier Vasquez (Illustrator)

Outstanding Literary Work – Biography/ Autobiography: "More Than Enough: Claiming Space for Who You Are (No Matter What They Say)," Elaine Welteroth

Outstanding Literary Work – Instructional: "Your Next Level Life: 7 Rules of Power, Confidence, And Opportunity For Black Women In America," Karen Arrington (Author), Joanna Price (Illustrator), Sheryl Taylor (Forward)

Outstanding Literary Work – Poetry: "Felon: Poems," Reginald Dwayne Betts

Outstanding Literary Work – Children: "Sulwe," Lupita Nyong'o (Author), Vashti Harrison (Illustrator)

Outstanding Literary Work – Youth/Teens: "Around Harvard Square," C.J. Farley

Directing

Outstanding Directing in a Comedy Series: Anya Adams, "Glow"

Outstanding Directing in a Drama Series: Curtis "50 Cent" Jackson, "Power"

Outstanding Directing in a Motion Picture (Television): Rashid Johnson, "Native Son"

Outstanding Directing in a Motion Picture (Film): Chiwetel Ejiofor, "The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind"

Writing

Outstanding Writing in a Comedy Series: "The Good Place," Tinker, Tailor, Demon, Spy

Outstanding Writing in a Drama Series: Nichelle Tramble Spellman, "Truth Be Told"

Outstanding Writing in a Motion Picture (Television): Suzan-Lori Parks, "Native Son"

Outstanding Writing in a Motion Picture (Film): Jordan Peele, "Us"

Animated or CGI

Outstanding Character Voice-Over Performance (Television or Motion Picture): James Earl Jones, "The Lion King"

Documentary

Outstanding Documentary (Film): "Toni Morrison: The Pieces I Am"

Outstanding Documentary (Television - Series or Special): "Hitsville: The Making of Motown"


Music
(YouTube)

The Best Afrobeats Songs Right Now

Featuring tracks from Joeboy, Amaarae, Odumodublvck, Wande Coal, Wizkid, Ckay, and more.

Afrobeats is one of the biggest cultural movements in the world. Influencing everything from fashion to sports, the music acts as the adhesive, catching on to listeners of all demographics and shaping the scene in Africa with great potential. With the growing number of new Afrobeats releases every month, it becomes necessary to round up the best of the bunch. From singles to new music videos, the continent’s vast expanse will be covered in our "Best Afrobeats Songs Out Right Now" column. Get started below.

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Music

Interview: Nevermind the Legend Talk, Wande Coal Just Wants To Make Good Music

We talk to the Nigerian icon about his fourth studio album, Legend Or No Legend, his much-awaited collaboration with T-Pain, and being the blueprint for Afrobeats.

There is no Mount Rushmore of Afrobeats without Wande Coal. If there ever was an emblem for the hallmark of Afrobeats as we know it today, that emblem would have his face on it.

When Afrobeats slowly evolved from its hip-hop and R&B influences, shepherded by forerunners 2face and D’banj, Wande Coal emerged with arguably one of the most defining imprints on the Nigerian pop scene: his 2009 debut album, Mushin 2 Mo’hits.

Released under the Don Jazzy & D’Banj led Mo’hits record label, Mushin 2 Mo’Hits shot Wande Coal to instant superstardom, spawning hit singles such as “You Bad”, “Kiss Your Hand”, “Bumper To Bumper,” and much more. The sixteen-track album also set the blueprint for Afrobeats melodies, delivery, and the overall soundscape, eventually setting the stage for the rise of pop-icons such as Wizkid, Davido, and more.

It would take another six years after his debut before another Wande Coal album would see the light of day. After a drawn-out departure from Mo’Hits Records to start his own imprint, Black Diamond Entertainment, and an intermittent presence within the music scene, Wande Coal released his critically-acclaimed 2015 sophomore album, Wanted.

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Music Brief
Image - YouTube Video Screenshot

Tiwa Savage Gets Jiggy In the Video for New Single "Pick Up"

Tiwa Savage is here to remind you, "Don't let no one play games with your heart."

Nigerian singer-songwriter Tiwa Savageis setting her fans up for one heck of a summer. Hot off of the release of her rousing single "Stamina," featuring fellow Nigerian talents Young Jonn and Ayra Starr, the Queen of Afrobeats has given us the tools needed to deal with a potential lover with terrible phone etiquette. Savage released the funky video for her latest single "Pick Up" and her line, "Not gone let the devil kolobi my happiness" had us sold from the get-go. The singer has released a number of singles this year, as fans pray that it means a full project is on the cards for us. The idea of someone not picking up Tiwa Savage's call is mindblowing, but, experiences make for great music so we assume something must have inspired the latest track.

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Arts + Culture
Photo courtesy Publicitygh.

AfroCuration is Bringing Untold Ghanaian Stories to Light

The two-day event, which consists of a Wikipedia edit-a-thon and linguistic workshop, is part of a greater push to share more local knowledge among young people on the continent.

The drive to share and document knowledge in the vernacular across the African continent has gathered momentum over the past couple of years, thanks to the growing WikiAfrica movement and AfroCuration events. After several iterations across Southern Africa, AfroCuration, which consists of a Wikipedia edit-a-thon and linguistic workshop, made its way to West Africa during the last weekend of May, adding Ghanaian indigenous languages into the mix.

Established in 2019 by the Moleskine Foundation and through the WikiAfrica Education program, AfroCuration seeks to encourage Africans to document their stories in their own local languages by adding entries into Wikipedia. “It started with this very genuine cultural and intellectual interest, and then it transformed over the years,” CEO of the Moleskine Foundation Adama Sanneh told OkayAfrica. “By bringing together the world of creativity and culture to the world of knowledge production, we created a program that is about inspiring young people from Africa to transition from passive knowledge consumers into active knowledge producers.”

Since its inception, AfroCuration has held events in Mozambique, South Africa, and Zimbabwe, in partnership with various culturally influential organizations. For its first event in Ghana, AfroCuration partnered with nonprofit independent internet radio station, Oroko Radio, and the Twi User Language Group, to produce content on African authors. “Oroko Radio is about empowering through conversation, collaboration, and community,” says co-founder Kikelomo Oludemi. “One of our key objectives is reclaiming and recentering narratives from the African diaspora artist communities.”

For Oludemi, taking part in this year’s event aligned closely with Oroko Radio’s ethos. “I think for us it was the realization that the people who tell the stories are the ones who dictate the narrative and that ultimately shapes the world moving forward,” she says.

An image of attendees of this year\u2019s AfroCuration with their arms up in the air, smiling as they take a group photo.This year’s AfroCuration took place for the first time in Ghana, with attendees gathering in Kumasi.Photo courtesy Publicitygh.

Held in Kumasi, three hours away from the capital city of Accra, this year’s AfroCuration brought together a vibrant group of people. Known for its rich musical history, and proximity to Ghana’s famous Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi was chosen as the venue for this event because of its youth culture, and the proximity of the Twi User Language Group, who aim to train and empower native speakers in preserving and telling their stories in local languages.

Jemima Antwi, a representative from the Twi User Language believes events such as this are pivotal to the development of local and continental culture. “AfroCuration would be very impactful to the community because people have the opportunity to be history-makers or part of the historical dispositions by contributing content about their great ancestors who have paved the way for the development of African cultural diversity,” she says. “It also increase[s] the richness of Ghanaian history and Africa as a whole because this event has created more knowledge about both our deceased and living legends.”

At the event, locals donned a mixture of local attire and business casual dress, but the singular characteristic across participants and attendees was a shared enthusiasm for knowledge about Ghanaian culture and history, and documenting that knowledge in local languages. “There is so much that I can take from my West African side that is almost inconceivable in the Western world,” Sanneh says. “If that type of experience, or that type of language is not preserved, then we will be entrapped into Western culture.”

A sprint of knowledge-gathering

Day two of AfroCuration was the most intense. Attendees were divided into groups based on language: namely, Gurune, Twi, Bagbani, Ewe, and Moore. The session featured three sprints of one-hour-long edit-a-thons split between forty-five-minute-long breaks, culminating in a culturally reflective commune with the attendees on the theme of “Who We Are.”

The program’s theme, “Who We Are” stems off the text by South African author, Lwando Xaso, but the intrinsic objective of AfroCuration’s debut event in Ghana which was held physically and streamed online was archiving information about culturally-relevant authors. The programme's eventual goal goes beyond knowledge activism, but rather molding the critical thinking of young people across Africa.

“We believe having access to such information in your local language can reshape your thinking, and your imagination,” says Sanneh. “The capacity to imagine the future in a different way; the capacity to conceptualize reality in a different gaze. The idea is about collective knowledge that ignites a dynamic relationship with language, culture and experiences, and through that dynamic exchange, then you can ignite creativity.” As Sanneh explains, the greater objective of AfroCuration is archiving information about Africa in order to spark new creativity.

Two attendees of this year\u2019s AfroCuration event, which incorporated the language groups of Gurune, Twi, Bagbani, Ewe and Moore.Two attendees of this year’s AfroCuration event, which incorporated the language groups of Gurune, Twi, Bagbani, Ewe and Moore.Photo courtesy Publicitygh.

The importance of an event like AfroCuration cannot be overemphasized. Not only does it flatten the knowledge gap, and celebrate African culture and heritage, it also provides young people with hard skills such as referencing and editing, and provides real-time data about knowledge-seekers.

The final day of AfroCuration proved to be the most laid back. Between thirty-minute breaks, the editing groups presented their work, which centered around creating Wikipedia articles on cultural authors in local languages. Prizes were awarded to the groups, based on the highest number of correctly-formatted articles created.

For community-powered organizations like Oroko Radio, AfroCuration is crucial in building community and most importantly, providing spaces for Africans to redress historically incorrect stories and preserve locally poignant stories. As Oludemi says, “The most important thing people can take from this event is that there [are] always stories to be told, and we have to be the ones to tell them.”

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