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Ghana Has Granted Citizenship to Members of the Diaspora Living in the Country

At least 126 people who've been living in Ghana for years have been granted citizenship as part of the 'Year of Return' celebrations.

Ghana has recently granted citizenship to at least 126 members of the diaspora who have been living in the country for years, according to the BBC. The decision is a part of the country's landmark 'Year of Return' celebrations which mark 400 years since the first African was sold at the beginning of the Trans-Atlantic slave trade.


Channel Africa reports that President Nana Akufo-Addo spoke at a ceremony held this past Wednesday and said to the new Ghanaian citizens that, "You have the responsibility of preserving and promoting the image of a country whose reputation, among the comity of nations, is, today, high." He added that relying on other countries for the development of Ghana was a "mind-set that [he wishes them] to discard, a mind-set of dependency and living on handouts".

Watch the Trailer for the Upcoming Documentary 'This is Ghana'

Ghana's 'Year of Return' is a tourist and investment initiative designed to attract the African Diaspora as 2019 marks the 400th anniversary of the beginning of the Trans-Atlantic slave trade in Jamestown, Virginia. In September of last year, President Nana Akufo-Addo declared and formally launched the initiative at a ceremony in Washington D.C. saying that, "We know of the extraordinary achievements and contributions they [Africans in the diaspora] made to the lives of the Americans, and it is important that this symbolic year—400 years later—we commemorate their existence and their sacrifices."

The initiative is currently being spearheaded by The Ghana Tourism Authority, the Office of Diaspora Affairs as well as The Adinkra Group of the USA.




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South African Filmmaker Carmen Sangion Unpacks Her Short Film 'Uncertainty'

Uncertainty, a film about a couple's emotional battles during lockdown, forms part of the global nine-chapter anthology project titled One(Nine).

During the COVID-19 pandemic in early 2020, nine filmmakers isolating in various parts of the world came together for a collective experiment. The global team of female filmmakers worked on short films which formed part of the anthology One(Nine), a nine-chapter project of perspectives and experiences — real, unreal, fiction, non-fiction and everything in between.

The team included Canada's Ingrid Veninger, Mina Shum, Isa Benn and Slater Jewell-Kemker, as well as Dorothee Wenner (Germany), Shengze Zhu (China/USA), Carmen Sangion (South Africa) and Lydia Zimmermann (Spain). One(Nine) premiered digitally at Canada's Female Eye Film Festival that ran from March 12to 29.

For this piece, South Africa's Carmen Sangion dissects Uncertainty, a film which interrogates Black men's vulnerability and mental health struggles through the lens of one couple's relationship battles during lockdown.

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