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Ghana Has Granted Citizenship to Members of the Diaspora Living in the Country

At least 126 people who've been living in Ghana for years have been granted citizenship as part of the 'Year of Return' celebrations.

Ghana has recently granted citizenship to at least 126 members of the diaspora who have been living in the country for years, according to the BBC. The decision is a part of the country's landmark 'Year of Return' celebrations which mark 400 years since the first African was sold at the beginning of the Trans-Atlantic slave trade.


Channel Africa reports that President Nana Akufo-Addo spoke at a ceremony held this past Wednesday and said to the new Ghanaian citizens that, "You have the responsibility of preserving and promoting the image of a country whose reputation, among the comity of nations, is, today, high." He added that relying on other countries for the development of Ghana was a "mind-set that [he wishes them] to discard, a mind-set of dependency and living on handouts".

Watch the Trailer for the Upcoming Documentary 'This is Ghana'

Ghana's 'Year of Return' is a tourist and investment initiative designed to attract the African Diaspora as 2019 marks the 400th anniversary of the beginning of the Trans-Atlantic slave trade in Jamestown, Virginia. In September of last year, President Nana Akufo-Addo declared and formally launched the initiative at a ceremony in Washington D.C. saying that, "We know of the extraordinary achievements and contributions they [Africans in the diaspora] made to the lives of the Americans, and it is important that this symbolic year—400 years later—we commemorate their existence and their sacrifices."

The initiative is currently being spearheaded by The Ghana Tourism Authority, the Office of Diaspora Affairs as well as The Adinkra Group of the USA.




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Photo by Minasse Wondimu Hailu/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images.

The African Union Condemns Violence Against #EndSARS Protesters in Nigeria

The African Union Commission chairperson has (finally) condemned the deadly violence against protesters calling for an end to police brutality in Nigeria. However, many feel the body's declaration is a little too late.

EWN reports that the African Union (AU) Commission chairperson Moussa Faki Mahamat has "strongly condemned the violence that erupted on 20 October 2020 during protests in Lagos, Nigeria that has resulted in multiple deaths and injuries." However, Mahamat's statement did not specifically denounce the actions of the security forces' actions. This past Tuesday, protesters calling for the disbandment of the infamous and an end to police brutality, were shot at by security forces at Lekki Toll Gate. The incident occurred shortly after an abrupt 24-hour curfew had been imposed by the State Governor, Babajide Sanwo-Olu, the AU has called for all involved "political and social actors to reject the use of violence and respect human rights and the rule of law" and recommended that they "privilege dialogue".
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