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Mdou Moctar performs on the Hydro Quebec stage at Place D'Youville during Day 4 of the 52nd Festival D'été Quebec (FEQ2019) on July 7, 2019 in Quebec City, Canada. (Photo by Ollie Millington/Redferns)

Celebrated Tuareg Musician, Mdou Moctar, Returns With New Single 'Ibitlan'

Listen to a psychedelic new track from the renowned Nigerien artist.

Celebrated Nigerien-born, Tuareg musician Mdou Moctar returns with the blazing new single "Ibitlan."

The psychedelic track sees the artist delivering electrifying guitar riffs in the Tuareg tradition. He sings passionately throughout the track, which as the artist notes, is a love song describing his lover's beauty. He further described the song in a statement via The Fader:

It's like when there's a valley, with a stream running through it, and all the plants are green. The song is about how my girlfriend is beautiful like that. Her skin is like a yellow flower, and her smile is like lightning.

The track is the artist's first since the release of his 2019 album, Ilana (The Creator), which NPR Music described as the most "insane psychedelic guitar album of the 21st century." Before then, he released 2017's Sousoume Tamachek.

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Bombino, the First Nigerien Artist to Be Nominated For a Grammy

The electrifying musician talks to OkayAfrica about wielding the Tuareg weapon of peace: a guitar.

Omara "Bombino" Moctar, 38, is the Nigerien guitarist who has recently been nominated for a grammy.

His electrifying, acoustic sound and Tamasheq lyrics that touch on his Tuareg heritage and connection with the desert have become a hit. His music is boundless. It is comprised of traditional Berber sounds, the blues, rock & roll and reggae. What is just as unique as the above is his story.

His people, the Tuareg, descendants of the Berbers of North Africa have long been nomads, traders and warriors within the Sahara Desert.

In his early years, Bombino grew up in an encampment in Agadez with his seventeen brothers and sisters and rebelliously refused to go to school. He would attend a French-Arabic school until the age of nine then leave and be taken in by his grandmother, who would instill in him Tuareg moral code.

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