Popular
Photo by Roger Sedres/Gallo Images via Getty Images.

South African police force gears up to enforce lockdown restrictions.

South Africans Angered by Police Killings of Black People During Lockdown

As America experiences continued protests over police brutality at the hands of a racist police system, South Africans are speaking out against their own anti-Black police system.

South Africans on social media are speaking out against continued police brutality since the commencement of the near 2-month national lockdown. Their anger comes after the death of several Black and Coloured men including Collins Khosa, Sibusiso Amos, Petrus Miggels and Adane Emmanuel. Investigations into the police officers involved in the deaths of these men have either been lethargic or closed prematurely without achieving the necessary justice for the victims and their families.


It is an incredibly tumultuous time all over the world and more especially for Black people. Already reeling from the impact of COVID-19 and how that has disproportionately affected Black communities globally, African-Americans have been protesting against the continued police brutality targeted at their community. The protests erupted in Minneapolis shortly after the alleged murder of George Floyd by white police officers.

In the case of Khosa, a Black man from Vosloorus, Johannesburg, the members of the South African National Defense Force (SANDF) who reportedly assaulted him at the beginning of April were initially suspended from their duties by the North Gauteng High Court. However, an inquiry made by the SANDF itself ruled that its members were not responsible for Khosa's death. Khosa's family is set to legally challenge the validity of that SANDF report.

Many South Africans on social media have been angered by the loss of life at the hands of what they feel is (and has been) an anti-Black police system inherited from the Apartheid era. While some have called to mobilise and protest, others have shared online petitions for the matter to be addressed by President Cyril Ramaphosa.

Naturally, as the conversation around Black-on-Black violence in the country continues, others have also called for the addressing of South Africa's notable xenophobia which has affected the lives of numerous African nationals in years gone by. Last year saw another spate of violent xenophobic attacks in Johannesburg especially.







From Your Site Articles
Music

6 Samples From 'Éthiopiques' in Hip-Hop

A brief history of Ethio-jazz cultural exchange featuring songs by Nas & Damian Marley, K'naan, Madlib and more.

This article was originally published on OkayAfrica in March, 2017. We're republishing it here for our Crossroads series.

It's 2000 something. I'm holed up in my bedroom searching for samples to chop up on Fruity Loops. While deep into the free-market jungle of Amazon's suggested music section, I stumble across a compilation of Ethiopian music with faded pictures of nine guys jamming in white suit jackets. I press play on the 30 second sample.

My mind races with the opportunities these breakbeats offered a budding beat maker. Catchy organs, swinging horns, funky guitar riffs, soulful melodies and grainy and pained vocalists swoon over love lost and gained. Sung in my mother tongue—Amharic—this was a far cry from the corny synthesizer music of the 1990s that my parents played on Saturday mornings. I could actually sample this shit.

The next day, I burn a CD and pop it into my dad's car. His eyes light up when the first notes ooze out of the speakers. “Where did you get this?" He asks puzzlingly. “The internet," I respond smiling.

In the 1970s my dad was one of thousands of high school students in Addis Ababa protesting the monarchy. The protests eventually created instability which lead to a coup d'état. The monarchy was overthrown and a Marxist styled military junta composed of low ranking officers called the Derg came to power. The new regime subsequently banned music they deemed to be counter revolutionary. When the Derg came into power, Amha Eshete, a pioneering record producer and founder of Ahma Records, fled to the US and the master recordings of his label's tracks somehow ended up in a warehouse in Greece.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

How Nigerian Streetwear Brand, Daltimore, is Rising To Celebrity Status

We spoke with founder and creative director David Omigie about expression through clothing and that #BBNaija pic.