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South African police force gears up to enforce lockdown restrictions.

South Africans Angered by Police Killings of Black People During Lockdown

As America experiences continued protests over police brutality at the hands of a racist police system, South Africans are speaking out against their own anti-Black police system.

South Africans on social media are speaking out against continued police brutality since the commencement of the near 2-month national lockdown. Their anger comes after the death of several Black and Coloured men including Collins Khosa, Sibusiso Amos, Petrus Miggels and Adane Emmanuel. Investigations into the police officers involved in the deaths of these men have either been lethargic or closed prematurely without achieving the necessary justice for the victims and their families.


It is an incredibly tumultuous time all over the world and more especially for Black people. Already reeling from the impact of COVID-19 and how that has disproportionately affected Black communities globally, African-Americans have been protesting against the continued police brutality targeted at their community. The protests erupted in Minneapolis shortly after the alleged murder of George Floyd by white police officers.

In the case of Khosa, a Black man from Vosloorus, Johannesburg, the members of the South African National Defense Force (SANDF) who reportedly assaulted him at the beginning of April were initially suspended from their duties by the North Gauteng High Court. However, an inquiry made by the SANDF itself ruled that its members were not responsible for Khosa's death. Khosa's family is set to legally challenge the validity of that SANDF report.

Many South Africans on social media have been angered by the loss of life at the hands of what they feel is (and has been) an anti-Black police system inherited from the Apartheid era. While some have called to mobilise and protest, others have shared online petitions for the matter to be addressed by President Cyril Ramaphosa.

Naturally, as the conversation around Black-on-Black violence in the country continues, others have also called for the addressing of South Africa's notable xenophobia which has affected the lives of numerous African nationals in years gone by. Last year saw another spate of violent xenophobic attacks in Johannesburg especially.







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Cameroon Holds Vigil to Remember Children Killed in School Attack

Residents in Kumba paid their respects to the seven lives lost, and those injured during the attack over the weekend.

In the latest tragedy to come from Cameroon's historically violent clash between Anglo and Francophone citizens, seven children were murdered after attackers stormed a school with guns and machetes over the weekend.

In what has been deemed as the "darkest and saddest day," by Bishop Agapitus Nfon of Kumba, armed attackers stormed the Mother Francisca International Bilingual Academy, targeting students aged 9 to 12. The tragic event saw dozens of children injured, some critically.

The attack has shocked the nation, with both local and international agencies condemning the horrible offense. On Monday, Cameroonian President Paul Biya denounced the "horrific murder" of the school children, and alluded to the "appropriate measures" being taken in order to bring justice to the families of the victims. Prime Minister Dion Ngute Joseph shared his condolences via a tweet saying, "I bow before the memory of these innocent kids."

The Cameroonian presidency and governing body have blamed Anglophone 'separatists' for the attack, though the group claims no part in the attack.

Human rights groups, however, have blamed both opposing parties, as the conflict has led to the death of over 3,000 deaths and resulted in more than 700,000 Cameroonians fleeing their homes and the country.

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Interview: Meet Velemseni, Eswatini’s Queen of Soul

Soul artist Velemseni's music reflects Eswatini culture and aesthetics. "The Kingdom of Eswatini is a magical and mysterious place, and my music aims to interpret and document that mystique, drawing from genres like Swazi gospel, soul, African soul, cinematic and traditional music," says the artist.