News Brief
(Photo by Erik McGregor/LightRocket via Getty Images)

Gambia Demands a 'Credible' Investigation Into the Police Killing of Diplomat’s Son, Momodou Lamin Sisay

Momodou Lamin Sisay, a Gambian man living in Georgia, was shot dead by police on Friday.

Friday morning saw yet another Black man killed at the hands of police in the United States of America.

In a statement made on May 29, Georgia Bureau of Investigation (GBI) stated that they had been called upon by the Georgia Police Department to investigate an officer's recent involvement in the shooting of a Black man in the town of Snellville, Georgia.

The Black man was identified on Tuesday as Momodou Lamin Sisay, the thirty-nine-year old son of former United Nations Diplomat, Lare Sisay.


According to the statement, at around 03:49 am, the police officer in question's attempt to stop the car was unsuccessful, resulting in a car chase. The investigating party said, "Officers approached the vehicle and gave verbal commands for the driver to show his hands. The driver did not comply… the driver pointed a handgun at the officers."

A standoff ensued, a SWAT team was called in, when the driver allegedly began to fire at them as well.

According to local reports, the deceased's father has said that he does not believe the police did enough to resolve the incident in a peaceful manner, and questions the claim that there was a firearm in his son's possession. In an interview with Gambian newspaper The Point, Sisay said of the incident, "We will do an independent autopsy and we want to get a private investigator to investigate the circumstances of his death and if necessary hire a lawyer to sue the Georgia state police. We're not going to let it go."

The Gambia's Ministry of Foreign Affairs sought out its embassy in Washington DC to "engage the relevant US authorities including the State Department to seek transparent, credible and objective investigation," it was revealed on Tuesday.

The murder of Sisay adds fuel to an already raging fire as people around the world take to the streets protesting police brutality and the unfair treatment of Black and African American individuals across the world following the police killing of George Floyd.

Interview
Photo: Benoit Peverelli

Interview: Oumou Sangaré Proves Why She's the Songbird of Wassoulou

We caught up with the Malian singer to talk about her new Acoustic album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

When Oumou Sangaré tells me freedom is at her core, I am not surprised. If you listen to her discography, you'll be hard-pressed to find a song that doesn't center or in some way touch on women's rights or child abuse. The Grammy award-winning Malian singer has spent a significant part of her career using her voice to fight for the rights of women across Africa and the world, a testimony to this is her naming her debut studio album Moussolou, meaning Woman. The album, a pure masterpiece that solidified Oumou's place amongst the greats and earned her the name 'Songbird of Wassoulou,' was a commercial success selling over 250,000 records in Africa and would in turn go on to inspire other singers across the world.

On her latest body of work Acoustic, a reworking of her critically acclaimed 2017 album Mogoya, Oumou Sangaré proves how and why she earned her accolades. The entirety of the 11-track album was recorded within two days in the Midi Live studio in Villetaneuse in 'live' conditions—with no amplification, no retakes or overdubs, no headphones. Throughout the album, using her powerful and raw voice that has come to define feminism in Africa and shaped opinions across the continent, Oumou boldly addresses themes like loss, polygamy and female circumcision.

We caught up with the Malian singer at the studio she is staying while in quarantine to talk about her new album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.