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The Black Women Who Made Big Strides in France in 2018

Yes, this was a bad year for many reasons, but we can still celebrate the black women who rose to prominence

Back in 2015, a group of Black women activists appeared in the French media: les afrofems. They were and still are, fighting against police brutality, for better inclusion in the media and to destroy harmful sexual stereotypes surrounding black women among other worthy goals. Since then, more influential Black women have gained a bigger representation in the media. And, even better, some of the afrofems activists, like Laura Nsafou and Amandine Gay, have made films and written books to bring more diversity to the entertainment industry.


2018 has, in many ways, been a year where black women made strides in France, at least in terms of culture. From winning Nobel prizes, to having best selling books and being on top of the charts, Black French women have showed that, no matter how much France wants to keep them under the radar, they're making moves. And, no matter the tragedies and terrible events that have shaped the year, it is something worth celebrating.

France's New Queen of Pop Music

We begin with Aya Nakamura, France's new queen of pop music. Her song Djadja was a summer hit. Everyone from Rihanna, to the French football team who successfully won their second world cup, sang it. Her sophomore album "Nakamura" has been certified gold in France and is still on top of the charts. She is the first French singer to have a number one album in the Netherlands since Edith Piaf in 1961. The last time a black woman was as visible in pop music was in 2004, with Lynsha's single "Hommes...Femmes".

Nakamura has received a huge backlash, mostly due to misogynoir—misogyny directed towards black women where race and gender both play roles. From a French presenter butchering her African first name despite the fact that he can easily pronounce words like "Aliagas", to online trolls calling her ugly and manly when a picture of her wearing no makeup surfaced, to people complaining that she is bringing down the quality of the entire French pop music industry, Nakamura responds to her critics gracefully. Her music is not groundbreaking but her album is full of catchy songs with lyrics using French slang she masters so well that she came up with her own words like "en catchana" (aka doggy style sex). And most importantly, many black girls and women can finally see someone like them in the media getting the success she deserves.

The Nobel Prize Winner

Photo via Wikimedia Commons

Another Black French woman has broken records this year: the Guadeloupean writer Maryse Condé who won the Alternative Nobel Prize, a prize meant to replace the Nobel Prize in Literature, after the scandal that the Swedish Academy of Literature faced last year. Condé wrote her first novel at only 11 years old and has been prolific ever since. A former professor of French literature at Columbia University, she has published more than 20 books since the 1970s, exploring the complex relationships within the African diaspora. "Segu", her most famous novel, is about the impact of the slave trade and Abrahamic religion on the Bambara empire in Mali in the 19th century. Condé's work is radical and she remains committed to writing feminist texts exploring the link between gender, race and class, as well as exploring the impact of colonialism. Condé is a pillar of Caribbean literature and it's taken long enough for her work has been acknowledged by the Nobel prize committee.

The Children's Books Writers

From Comme un Million de Papillon Noir

And finally, 2018 has been the year where France's children's literature industry has finally understood how important, for the public, writers and publishers, being inclusive and diverse was. From Laura Nsafou's Comme un Million de Papillon Noir, a best selling book about a young black girl learning to love her natural hair which sold more than 6000 copies, to Neiba Je-sais-tout: Un Portable dans le Cartable, the second book of Madina Guissé published this year after a successful crowdfunding campaign, there are more and more children's and young adult books with non white protagonists. In France, there are still no stats about how diversity is doing, but in America, in 2017, only 7 percent of writers of children's literature were either Black, Latino or Native American.

There's still much to accomplish in France for the Black community to have better representation in the media, politics and all walks of life, but important strides have been accomplished this year, and it make me hopeful for what 2019 and the following years have in store.

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(Youtube)

Wizkid Spoils Fans By Dropping the Music Video For 'No Stress'

Oh, you thought he was done for the day?

All in a day's work! Nigerian superstar Wizkid is climbing his way further and further up the charts (and our lists of favourites) by releasing visuals to accompany track "No Stress," off of his freshly released album Made In Lagos.

It's hard not to move to the track on its own, and now we have a plethora of beautiful African women to virtually jam out with. The release of the second single off the high anticipated MIL album comes as Wizkid toyed with fans by simply tweeting "No Stress."

So far, the album has amassed over a million streams in under 24 hours on Boomplay. The 14-track album features music heavy weights including Burna Boy, Skepta, Damian Marley, H.E.R., Ella Mai and Terri.

The album was originally meant to drop two weeks ago, but with the political and social terror occurring presently in his home country Nigeria, Wizkid chose to delay it.

Watch the music video for "No Stress" by Wizkid below.

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(Youtube)

The 10 Best Ghanaian Songs of the Month (October)

Featuring Medikal, Kuami Eugene, Juls, Bisa Kdei and more.

In October 2020, Ghana's most talented artists and producers came through as usual and blessed us with several songs and projects that have been the soundtrack of our month.

This month we had hot new additions to Ghana's very popping drill scene, career-defining albums, career-reviving hits, #EndSARS themed songs, and so much more. We give you the cream of the crop right here. Check out our best Ghanaian songs of the month below!

Follow our GHANA WAVE playlist on Spotify here and Apple Music here.

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Image supplied by the artist.

Interview: Master KG Talks 'Jerusalema' and Taking Bolobedu House to the World

Prolific South African artist Master KG talks about the international success of 'Jerusalema' , his next music project and hints at an epic collaboration with a certain music heavyweight.

If you haven't heard about South African musician and DJ Master KG then you have definitely been living under a gigantic rock for the past few months. With the international success of his 2019 release "Jerusalema" featuring Nomcebo Zikode, whether you're in America or Europe, New Zealand or Africa, Master KG is an artist on everyone's playlists––and for good reason.

The 24-year-old Limpopo-born artist is behind the viral #JerusalemaDanceChallenge that has seen fans across the world participating not only for social media but even as "team building" exercises at their various workplaces. Admittedly, as the world continues to figure out what life alongside the COVID-19 pandemic looks like, Master KG's music has provided a much-needed moment of reprieve for so many people other than just South Africans.

Aside from "Jerusalema" however, Master KG has a number of hits within his extensive discography in the uniquely South African bolobedu house genre, a "mixture of Afro house instrumentals and bolobedu melodies usually sung with high-pitched autotune (a staple in the subgenre)". Tracks like "Skeleton Move", "Waya Waya" and "Di Boya Limpopo" have become almost anthemic for South Africans particularly during the festive season. For this, Master KG has received and been nominated for several awards including the MTV Europe Music Award for Best African Act and Best Male Southern Africa at the African Muzik Magazine Awards (Afrimma). And while he was surprisingly snubbed at this year's South African Music Awards (SAMAs), it's quite evident that that was a huge mistake on their part and one they won't be making again.

We caught up with Master KG to talk about the international sensation that "Jerusalema" has become, some of the other major projects he's working on, repping hard for Limpopo and how he's hoping to take bolobedu house to the rest of the world.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

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Burna Boy Vocalizes Nigeria’s Grief In New Track '20:10:20'

The Nigerian star channels pain, frustration and disappointment in his latest release.