Popular
Photo by Luke Dray/Getty Images

KAMPALA, UGANDA - NOVEMBER 03: Bobi Wine parades though the streets through crowds of supporters on November 03, 2020 in Kampala, Uganda. Popular singer Robert Kyagulanyi Ssentamu, better known by his stage name of H.E. Bobi Wine, is set to appear before the Independent Electoral Commission this morning to be nominated to stand against incumbent Yoweri Museveni in the upcoming Presidential elections in Uganda.

Bobi Wine Arrested After Being Certified as Presidential Candidate

Ugandan politician Bobi Wine has been arrested after he was certified as a presidential candidate for the upcoming 2021 elections.

Ugandan opposition leader Bobi Wine has reportedly been arrested again. According to SkyNews, Bobi Wine was arrested in the capital of Kampala hours after receiving certification papers to run in Uganda's 2021 elections. There are conflicting reports about the exact details of the arrest, however, SkyNews further relates that the politician was forcefully removed from his car by the Ugandan police. A clash between Bobi Wine's supporters and the police reportedly ensued after the politician was taken away. Bobi Wine's arrest was captured and shared on Twitter by members of his National Unity Platform party.


Read: Bobi Wine Released From Police Custody Following Arrest

Bobi Wine, real name, Robert Kyagulanyi Ssentamu, was allegedly dragged from inside his car and taken away after publicly receiving certification papers from Uganda's electorate. He is now officially a viable presidential candidate for the upcoming 2021 elections. Ugandan authorities have not yet given any reasons for the opposition leader's recent arrest although it is thought that it is yet another attempt to intimidate the politician who is set to run against long-standing President Yoweri Museveni. The 76-year-old president has been ruling the country for 34 years since 1986.

This is not the first time that Bobi Wine has been arrested. In October of last year, Ugandan police surrounded the politician's home following the cancellation of his Independence Day music concert by authorities. Additionally, he was arrested later that year in December and went on to spend New Year's Day in prison.

Ugandans and many international political analysts suspect that President Museveni ordered the recent arrest. There has also been no official information on Bobi Wine's whereabouts since the arrest occurred. Police, according to the Washington Post, fired teargas to disperse supporters and members of the politician's opposition party who were waiting outside Bobi Wine's house.

From Your Site Articles
Related Articles Around the Web
Music
Photo by Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Hugh Masekela's New York City Legacy

A look back at the South African legend's time in New York City and his enduring presence in the Big Apple.

In Questlove's magnificent documentary, Summer of Soul, he captures a forgotten part of Black American music history. But in telling the tale of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, the longtime musician and first-time filmmaker also captures a part of lost South African music history too.

Among the line-up of blossoming all-stars who played the Harlem festival, from a 19-year-old Stevie Wonder to a transcendent Mavis Staples, was a young Hugh Masekela. 30 years old at the time, he was riding the wave of success that came from releasing Grazing in the Grass the year before. To watch Masekela in that moment on that stage is to see him at the height of his time in New York City — a firecracker musician who entertained his audiences as much as he educated them about the political situation in his home country of South Africa.

The legacy Masekela sowed in New York City during the 1960s remains in the walls of the venues where he played, and in the dust of those that are no longer standing. It's in the records he made in studios and jazz clubs, and on the Manhattan streets where he once posed with a giant stuffed zebra for an album cover. It's a legacy that still lives on in tangible form, too, in the Hugh Masekela Heritage Scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music.

The school is the place where Masekela received his education and met some of the people that would go on to be life-long bandmates and friends, from Larry Willis (who, as the story goes, Masekela convinced to give up opera for piano) to Morris Goldberg, Herbie Hancock and Stewart Levine, "his brother and musical compadre," as Mabusha Masekela, Bra Hugh's nephew says.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.