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(Photo by Amy Sussman/Getty Images for Warner Music)

Burna Boy performs onstage at the Warner Music Group Pre-Grammy Party on January 23, 2020 in Hollywood, California.

Watch a Video of UK Protesters Dancing to Burna Boy’s ‘Ye’

A joyful and powerful act of community in an otherwise distressing environment.

A clip of UK protesters dancing to Nigerian artist Burna Boy's hit single "Ye" surfaced on social media this week.

The minute-long clip shows a group of individuals taking turns to dance in a circle, while the crowds cheer each other on. The choice of "Ye" was fitting, as the 2018 song speaks to a cry for freedom. The track, which is fondly considered Nigeria's second national anthem, speaks to police brutality and the abuse and embarrassment often imposed upon Nigerians, and Africans as a whole, due to their appearances.


In an interview with Fader, Burna Boy spoke of the music video for the song by saying, "Ye is a song that essentially shows the unrelenting nature of Nigerians (where I'm from). We thrive despite the leadership and circumstances … 'I can't come and kill myself' is an expression that means, you can't dwell on things that aren't working out or looking good, you only have one life after all."

With that context, understanding the connection between the protesters dancing and the afro-fusion track makes for an incredibly powerful visual. The incident speaks to the recent influx of people protesting police brutality and racial injustices worldwide, after the death of George Floyd, an unarmed Black man. While the incident took place in the United States of America, societies and communities from all over the world are finding parallels within their own justice systems and are finding power in numbers.

Check out the video below.


UK protestors vibing to YE by Burna Boy - Black Lives Matter www.youtube.com

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Photo by Craig Barritt/Getty Images for Qatar Museums

Influential Louis Vuitton And Off-White Designer Virgin Abloh, Dies at 41

The popular Ghanian-American designer had been battling a rare form of cancer in private for several years.

The fashion industry has lost a talented, unique, and boundary-pushing influence this weekend.

41-year-old Ghanianian-American designer Virgil Abloh has died after a 2 year battle with a rare form of cancer, a statement from his associates LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton said on Sunday. Abloh, founder of luxury streetwear brand Off-White, and artistic director of men's wear at French fashion house Louis Vuitton leaves his wife Shannon, and 2 children - Lowe and Grey. Chairman and CEO of LVMH Bernard Arnault said in a statement, "We are all shocked after this terrible news. Virgil was not only a genius designer, a visionary, he was also a man with a beautiful soul and great wisdom." "The LVMH family joins me in this moment of great sorrow, and we are all thinking of his loved ones after the passing of their husband, their father, their brother, or their friend," he added.

After the news broke on Sunday, Abloh started trending on Twitter, with fans of the designer remembering his influence on music, art, and fashion. The 1990s saw Abloh DJ and the creative director once told The Guardian in a 2016 interview, "When the phone is off, I play my favorite songs really loud for myself, and I'm not talking to anyone. I'm not managing anything. It's just like a time when I can listen to music… I'll be DJing after I'm done designing or doing anything else." Virgil got his hands into designing album artworks after strumming up a friendship with American rapper Kanye West before becoming the creative director of West's DONDA Creative House. More recently known for his creative streetwear brand 'Off-White' the designer became popular among fashion-conscious youngsters and will forever be immortalized.

A statement posted to Abloh's Instagram explained that "Virgil chose to endure his battle privately since his diagnosis in 2019, undergoing numerous challenging treatments, all while helming several significant institutions that span fashion, art, and culture"

Friends, fans, and colleagues took to social media to share their well-wishes for Virgil as he transitions to his next destination.



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