Film
Photo: Courtesy of Amazon Prime

Coming 2 America Out on March 5th

The Trailer for ‘Coming 2 America’ Is Here and It Looks As Iconic As the First

The highly-anticipated and long-awaited Coming to America sequel will be available March 5 on Amazon Prime.

Finally!

After months of guessing who would show up in the sequel and who wouldn't be making their way back to New York City, fans of the newly-crowned King Akeem (played by Eddie Murphy) and his most committed companion Semmi (Arsenio Hall) have been gifted a trailer and official movie poster—30 years after the first and icon film.

The two-and-half-minute long trailer leads us to believe that the film, directed by Craig Brewer, will just be as entertaining as the first. The film follows Murphy and Hall as they travel back to New York City to find the King's son, and the adventures that ensue upon return to the abundant country of Zamunda.

And as if film legends Murphy and Hall weren't enough to sell you on the film, the star studded cast might be the selling point. Expect appearances from the likes of James Earl Jones returning as King Jaffe Joffer, Shari Headley as Queen Lisa, John Amos as Cleo McDowell and Louie Anderson who plays Maurice. Other mentionable appearances include Wesley Snipes, Leslie Jones, Tracy Morgan Teyana Taylor and South Africa's Nomzamo Mbatha. There were also rumors of a Davido appearance, and yes you most likely heard it from us.

The sequel was written by Kenya Barris, Barry W. Blaustein, David Sheffield, and Justin Kanew.

Cast and crew aside, with how iconic the first film was, we're excited what King Akeem and Semmi will get themselves in to this time around.


Check out the trailer for Coming 2 America here!

Coming 2 America Official Trailer #2 | Prime Video www.youtube.com

Music
Photo by Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Hugh Masekela's New York City Legacy

A look back at the South African legend's time in New York City and his enduring presence in the Big Apple.

In Questlove's magnificent documentary, Summer of Soul, he captures a forgotten part of Black American music history. But in telling the tale of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, the longtime musician and first-time filmmaker also captures a part of lost South African music history too.

Among the line-up of blossoming all-stars who played the Harlem festival, from a 19-year-old Stevie Wonder to a transcendent Mavis Staples, was a young Hugh Masekela. 30 years old at the time, he was riding the wave of success that came from releasing Grazing in the Grass the year before. To watch Masekela in that moment on that stage is to see him at the height of his time in New York City — a firecracker musician who entertained his audiences as much as he educated them about the political situation in his home country of South Africa.

The legacy Masekela sowed in New York City during the 1960s remains in the walls of the venues where he played, and in the dust of those that are no longer standing. It's in the records he made in studios and jazz clubs, and on the Manhattan streets where he once posed with a giant stuffed zebra for an album cover. It's a legacy that still lives on in tangible form, too, in the Hugh Masekela Heritage Scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music.

The school is the place where Masekela received his education and met some of the people that would go on to be life-long bandmates and friends, from Larry Willis (who, as the story goes, Masekela convinced to give up opera for piano) to Morris Goldberg, Herbie Hancock and Stewart Levine, "his brother and musical compadre," as Mabusha Masekela, Bra Hugh's nephew says.

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