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Kabza De Small is 2019’s Most Streamed South African Artist on Spotify by SA Audiences

Amapiano frontrunner Kabza De Small tops the list of the most streamed South African artists on Spotify in SA.

2019 definitely is the year of the yanos (amapiano). After years of bubbling under, the subgenre of South African house music has officially arrived in the country's mainstream music scene. Kabza De Small, one of the genre's frontrunners, was a favorite to South African audiences on Spotify in 2019.


Last year, the same position was occupied by the rapper Nasty C.

Read: This Documentary Takes You Inside Amapiano, South Africa's Popular House Music Subgenre

Amapiano has come a long way from being a genre deeply rooted in piracy, as early amapiano songs used to get distributed on free file-hosting platforms like DataFileHost and Fakaza and even WhatsApp.

As a result, not a lot of Kabza's music is on Spotify. His 14-track project Pretty Girls Love Amapiano is the only one of his solo releases that can be streamed on Spotify. It's in the company of Scorpion Kings, Piano Hub and The Return of the Scorpion Kings, all of which are joint EPs he released with DJ Maphorisa this year.

Spotify recently released statistics of the most streamed artists, albums and songs for 2019. As revealed in the statistics, South Africans are still streaming more western music than local artists. Post Malone and Swae Lee's "Sunflower" was the most streamed songs on Spotify by South African audiences. Post Malone's album Hollywood Bleeding was the most streamed album on the platform by South Africans. Khalid was the most streamed artists by South Africans in 2019.

Below are the full lists of the most streamed artists, songs and albums by South African audiences.

​Most streamed South African artists in South Africa

1. Kabza Da Small

2. DJ Maphorisa

3. Nasty C

4. Prince Kaybee

5. Spoegwolf

6. Black Coffee

7. Joyous Celebration

8. Sjava

9. Snotkop

10. AKA

Most Streamed South African female artists in South Africa


1. Shekhinah

2. Lady Zamar

3. Karen Zoid

4. Simmy

5. Juanita Du Plessis

6. Ami Faku

7. Lebo Sekgobela

8. Zonke

9. Sho Madjozi

10. Karlien Van Jaarsveld

Most streamed South African male artists in South Africa

1. Kabza Da Small

2. DJ Maphorisa

3. Nasty C

4. Prince Kaybee

5. Spoegwolf

6. Black Coffee

7. Sjava

8. Snotkop

9. Mlindo The Vocalist

10. AKA

Most streamed artists in South Africa

1. Khalid

2. Post Malone

3. Drake

4. Ed Sheeran

5. Billie Eilish

6. Ariana Grande

7. Chris Brown

8. The Chainsmokers

9. Beyoncé

10. J. Cole

Most streamed female artists in South Africa

1. Billie Eilish

2. Ariana Grande

3. Beyoncé

4. Taylor Swift

5. Halsey

6. Camila Cabello

7. Rihanna

8. Nicki Minaj

9. Cardi B

10. Bebe Rexha










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Photo by Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Hugh Masekela's New York City Legacy

A look back at the South African legend's time in New York City and his enduring presence in the Big Apple.

In Questlove's magnificent documentary, Summer of Soul, he captures a forgotten part of Black American music history. But in telling the tale of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, the longtime musician and first-time filmmaker also captures a part of lost South African music history too.

Among the line-up of blossoming all-stars who played the Harlem festival, from a 19-year-old Stevie Wonder to a transcendent Mavis Staples, was a young Hugh Masekela. 30 years old at the time, he was riding the wave of success that came from releasing Grazing in the Grass the year before. To watch Masekela in that moment on that stage is to see him at the height of his time in New York City — a firecracker musician who entertained his audiences as much as he educated them about the political situation in his home country of South Africa.

The legacy Masekela sowed in New York City during the 1960s remains in the walls of the venues where he played, and in the dust of those that are no longer standing. It's in the records he made in studios and jazz clubs, and on the Manhattan streets where he once posed with a giant stuffed zebra for an album cover. It's a legacy that still lives on in tangible form, too, in the Hugh Masekela Heritage Scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music.

The school is the place where Masekela received his education and met some of the people that would go on to be life-long bandmates and friends, from Larry Willis (who, as the story goes, Masekela convinced to give up opera for piano) to Morris Goldberg, Herbie Hancock and Stewart Levine, "his brother and musical compadre," as Mabusha Masekela, Bra Hugh's nephew says.

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