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Watch Beyoncé Pay Homage to Fela Kuti During Her Coachella Performance

The singer's band played Fela Kuti's "Zombie" during her unforgettable set last night.

Unless you've been living under a wi-fi-less rock for the past few days, you've heard all the hype around #BeyChella—Beyoncé's highly-anticipated return to the stage at this year's Coachella music festival in California.

The star took over the festival's main stage last night for a 2 hour-long set which saw her running through her entire discography, bringing to the stage special guests like Jay-Z, Solange and even fellow Destiny's Child bandmates Kelly Rowland and Michelle Williams.

As expected, Beyoncé's set was electrifying and filled with odes to various aspects of black music, history and culture. At one point, the singer payed homage to Fela Kuti as her band ran through a pulsating rendition of the afrobeat legend's 1976 classic "Zombie." Check out the clip below.


It's certainly not the first time Beyoncé has paid her respects to Fela, she's spoken of his inspiration on her music on several occasions, even recording a 20-track Fela Kuti-inspired album prior to the release of her album 4 back in 2011.

The singer is the first black woman ever to headline the festival and her performance was brimming with references to black history and icons, female empowerment, and even historically black universities. She opened her show by singing "Lift Every Voice and Sing," also known as the Black National Anthem, before being joined on stage by a group of majorettes and a full marching band.

Of course, the internet has been ablaze all morning with folks trying to figure out how to enroll at Beyoncé's #HBeyCU and candid reactions to how amazingly black and proud #BeyChella was.








Needless to say, #BeyChella was an experience. The singer will return to the Coachella stage again next weekend so prepare to have your edges snatched again before they even have a chance to grow back! You can stream all the Coachella action live here.

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Watch Davido Perform 'Assurance' & 'Jowo' On Jimmy Kimmel Live

The Nigerian superstar performed for the late night American TV show.

Davido stopped by Jimmy Kimmel Live last night to give viewers a lively performance.

Backed by a full band, the Nigerian superstar kicked things off by playing A Good Time single "Assurance," which will reportedly be featured in the Coming 2 America soundtrack. After a quick interlude and set change—a king's throne appeared onstage—Davido and his band went into a medley of "Jowo," his A Better Time single.

Davido's been busy this year as he recently shared the music video for A Better Time's "The Best" alongside Mayorkun, was featured in the remix of Focalistic's "Ke Star," and collaborated with Teni on "For You."

Watch Davido's Jimmy Kimmel live performance of "Assurance" and "Jowo (Medley) below.

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Still taken from 'Walking With Shadows film trailer'

Opinion: Nollywood & the Imminent Second Coming of Queer Cinema

An exploration of queer representation and misrepresentation in Nollywood, jaded stereotypes and what the future of queer cinema in Nollywood could look like.

In a scene from Daniel Orhiari's 2018 psychological thriller Sylvia, Richard (Chris Attoh) and Obaro (Udoka Oyeka) are friends casually catching up while drinking at a bar. When Richard tells him that he's in love with a woman he's just met and intends to marry her, Obaro is relieved and chuckles. ''I was beginning to wonder, you know, if you were gay or something,'' he says. While Richard looks incredulous and rejects the notion, the scene devolves into both a commentary and cautionary tale about married gay men in Lagos sleeping with their houseboys, reinforcing the idea that homosexuality is synonymous with paedophilia.

The homophobia in the scene becomes truly apparent when the bartender, having heard their conversation, slips his phone number towards Obaro after Richard leaves. Although Obaro had told his friend he has nothing against gay people, he shows disdain towards the bartender and flees the bar. Queer representation may be non-existent in Nollywood, but pockets of homophobia like this have showed up in the works of overzealous filmmakers, as shown in Ramsey Nouah's Living in Bondage: Breaking Free (2019) where the male protagonist was assumed to be gay after he indicated interest in a woman.

Nollywood is a microcosm of the larger virulently homophobic Nigerian society, but queer cinema had somewhat thrived around the early 2000's before flatlining into oblivion. This era followed the home video boom that began in the '90s, and was marked by slightly changing attitudes–or curiosity–about sex and sexuality. Soft pornography was consumed in the form of magazines (Hints) and other variants, glossy booklets with hardcore images were openly sold in shops, depicting women engaging in sexual acts with men or with themselves, and video porn was widely available in public spaces.

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Photo by Sabelo Mkhabela.

ProVerb’s Memoir Is A Huge Slap In The Face To South African Hip-Hop

In his memoir, one of South Africa's revered lyricists ProVerb and his co-author compromise his rich story with trite motivational talk.

The Book of Proverb

ProVerb has had a strange relationship with the SA hip-hop scene. Albeit being one of the most gifted lyricists the country has ever seen, he has grown to flow less and hustle more. Despite this, his name still comes up when the greatest (South) African rappers of all time are mentioned. MTV Base placed him as the 7th in their list of the greatest SA MCs of all time in 2018 for example.

The rapper-turned-media personality dedicates a paragraph of his memoir, The Book of Proverb, to explaining his complicated relationship with hip-hop. "Although I built my brand as a hip-hop artist, I never enjoyed full support or success from it," he writes. "Music is and always will remain a pass ion, but it stopped being viable when it stopped making business sense to me. If I was given more support, I might continue, but for now, I'll focus on my other hustles."

On the cover of the book which was released towards the end of 2020 by Penguin, Verb is wearing a charcoal blazer and sporting a white ball cap, so one can be forgiven for getting into it expecting both sides of his story. This memoir, however, is too vague to be a worthy read if you aren't necessarily reading to get motivated but to be simply informed and inspired.

While a few of The Book of ProVerb's chapters touch on his rap career, most of the book is about ProVerb the man, personality and businessman. Not so much one of the country's finest lyricists. This omission is a huge slap in the face for his fans and SA hip-hop fans in general.

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Filmmaker Akinola Davies Jr Explores the Sweet Spot Between Nollywood & Hollywood

Winner of the 2021 Sundance Film Festival, London-based Nigerian filmmaker Akinola Davies Jr speaks about his experimental film 'Lizard', what belonging looks like and the overlap between Hollywood and Nollywood.