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Burna Boy, Teni, AKA, Sho Madjozi, Mr Eazi & More Earn 2019 BET Award Nominations

This year's "Best International Act" categories are stacked with some of the biggest names in African pop.

The nominees for this year's BET Awards have been announced, and one again, some of the biggest names in African pop have been named in the " International Act" categories.

This year, Nigerian acts Burna Boy, Mr Eazi have been nominated in the "Best International Act" category. They've each had standout years, with both artists performing at the Coachella Music Festival this year.

They're nominated alongside South African star rapper AKA, who won a Kids' Choice Award earlier this year for "Favorite South African Star," and the French-Malian pop singer and one of OkayAfrica's 100 Women Aya Nakamura. French-Cameroonian and Togolese rapper Dosseh and UK rappers Dave, and Giggs round out the heavily-stacked category.


The "Best New International Act" has some formidable talents as well. Fellow OkayAfrica 100 Women nominees Teni the Entertainer—who we deemed the breakout star of 2018—and popular South African rapper and poet Sho Madjozi are both up for the award.

READ: Op-Ed: What Sho Madjozi Taught Me About Fearlessness

British-Nigerian rapper Headie One is nominated in the same category along with budding French artists Jok'Air and Nesly. UK-based Angolan rapper Octavian closes out the category.

The nominations also include Issa Rae and Tiffany Haddish who are both up for Best Actress.

Last year, Davido took home the award, and urged the audience to "come to Africa" in his acceptance speech. Other past winners include Wizkid, Black Coffee and D'Banj, just to name a few.

This year will be a tight race between some of the continent's biggest stars. We can't wait to see which of these talents goes home with the award.

The BET Awards will take place on June 23rd. Read on fo the full list of 2019 nominees below.

2019 BET Award Nominees:

Video of the year: 21 Savage featuring J. Cole, "A Lot"; Cardi B, "Money"; Cardi B and Bruno Mars, "Please Me"; Childish Gambino, "This Is America"; Drake, "Nice for What"; The Carters, "Apes(asterisk)(asterisk)t."

Best female R&B/pop artist: Beyoncé; Ella Mai; H.E.R.; Solange; SZA; Teyana Taylor.

Best male R&B/pop artist: Anderson .Paak; Bruno Mars; Childish Gambino; Chris Brown; John Legend; Khalid.

Best female hip-hop artist: Cardi B; Kash Doll; Lizzo; Megan Thee Stallion; Nicki Minaj; Remy Ma.

Best male hip-hop artist: 21 Savage; Drake; J. Cole; Meek Mill; Nipsey Hussle; Travis Scott.

Best new artist: Blueface; City Girls; Juice WRLD; Lil Baby; Queen Naija.

Best group: Chloe x Halle; City Girls; Lil Baby and Gunna; Migos; The Carters.

Best collaboration: 21 Savage featuring J. Cole, "A Lot"; Cardi B and Bruno Mars, "Please Me"; Cardi B featuring J Balvin and Bad Bunny, "I Like It"; H.E.R. featuring Bryson Tiller, "Could've Been"; Travis Scott featuring Drake, "Sicko Mode"; Tyga featuring Offset, "Taste."

Album of the year: Cardi B, "Invasion of Privacy"; Ella Mai, "Ella Mai"; Meek Mill, "Championships"; The Carters, "Everything Is Love"; Travis Scott, "Astroworld."

Viewers' choice award: Cardi B featuring J Balvin and Bad Bunny, "I Like It"; Childish Gambino, "This Is America"; Drake, "In My Feelings"; Ella Mai, "Trip"; J. Cole, "Middle Child"; Travis Scott featuring Drake, "Sicko Mode."

Dr. Bobby Jones best gospel/inspirational award: Erica Campbell featuring Warryn Campbell, "All of My Life"; Fred Hammond, "Tell Me Where It Hurts"; Kirk Franklin, "Love Theory"; Snoop Dogg featuring Rance Allen, "Blessing Me Again"; Tori Kelly featuring Kirk Franklin, "Never Alone."

Best actress: Issa Rae; Regina Hall; Regina King; Taraji P. Henson; Tiffany Haddish; Viola Davis.

Best actor: Anthony Anderson; Chadwick Boseman; Denzel Washington; Mahershala Ali; Michael B. Jordan; Omari Hardwick.

Best movie: "Blackkklansman"; "Creed 2″; "If Beale Street Could Talk"; "Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse"; "The Hate U Give."

Youngstars award: Caleb McLaughlin; Lyric Ross; Marsai Martin; Michael Rainey Jr.; Miles Brown.

Sportswoman of the year: Allyson Felix; Candace Parker; Naomi Osaka; Serena Williams; Simone Biles.

Sportsman of the year: Kevin Durant; LeBron James; Odell Beckham Jr.; Stephen Curry; Tiger Woods.

BET HER award: Alicia Keys, "Raise a Man"; Ciara, "Level Up"; H.E.R., "Hard Place"; Janelle Monae, "PYNK"; Queen Naija, "Mama's Hand"; Teyana Taylor, "Rose in Harlem."

Video director of the year: Benny Boom; Colin Tilley; Dave Meyers; Hype Williams; Karena Evans.

Best international act: AKA (South Africa); Aya Nakamura (France); Burna Boy (Nigeria); Dave (U.K.); Dosseh (France); Giggs (U.K.); Mr Eazi (Nigeria).

Best new international act: Headie One (U.K.); Jok'Air (France); Nesly (France); Octavian (U.K.); Sho Madjozi (South Africa); Teni (Nigeria).

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Photo by Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Hugh Masekela's New York City Legacy

A look back at the South African legend's time in New York City and his enduring presence in the Big Apple.

In Questlove's magnificent documentary, Summer of Soul, he captures a forgotten part of Black American music history. But in telling the tale of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, the longtime musician and first-time filmmaker also captures a part of lost South African music history too.

Among the line-up of blossoming all-stars who played the Harlem festival, from a 19-year-old Stevie Wonder to a transcendent Mavis Staples, was a young Hugh Masekela. 30 years old at the time, he was riding the wave of success that came from releasing Grazing in the Grass the year before. To watch Masekela in that moment on that stage is to see him at the height of his time in New York City — a firecracker musician who entertained his audiences as much as he educated them about the political situation in his home country of South Africa.

The legacy Masekela sowed in New York City during the 1960s remains in the walls of the venues where he played, and in the dust of those that are no longer standing. It's in the records he made in studios and jazz clubs, and on the Manhattan streets where he once posed with a giant stuffed zebra for an album cover. It's a legacy that still lives on in tangible form, too, in the Hugh Masekela Heritage Scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music.

The school is the place where Masekela received his education and met some of the people that would go on to be life-long bandmates and friends, from Larry Willis (who, as the story goes, Masekela convinced to give up opera for piano) to Morris Goldberg, Herbie Hancock and Stewart Levine, "his brother and musical compadre," as Mabusha Masekela, Bra Hugh's nephew says.

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