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Wizkid is the First African to Reach 8 Million Monthly Listeners on Spotify

African artists continue to smash records with their music this year.

Although Wizkid is still to release an official single for this year, he's been on a great run in terms of some dope collaborations. Beside working on the Lion King: The Gift album with Beyoncé and their subsequent epic collaboration on "Brown Skin Girl", arguably one of this year's biggest anthems, the talented Nigerian artist has also hopped onto a number of tracks alongside GoldLink, Kojo Funds and Skepta. After having been nominated for the 2019 Afrikan Muzik Magazine Awards (AFRIMMA) and performed at the inaugural Afro Nation Festival in Portugal earlier this month, it comes as no surprise that he's recently made history on Spotify as the first African artist to reach 8 million monthly listeners on the streaming platform.


Related: Listen to New Wizkid Songs From His Surprise 2019 EP 'Soundman Vol. 1'

While fans are awaiting in anticipation for Wizkid's "Joro", a single he's been promising to drop since June but hasn't officially done so as yet, the artist is reportedly working on his fourth studio album entitled Made in Lagos.

This year has certainly seen the rising popularity of African artists, especially Nigerian artists, and their music in the mainstream. Just last month, Davido set the record for the most viewed Nigerian artist on YouTube with a whopping 500 million views across his music videos. Additionally, Burna Boy's monster album, African Giant, ranked 16th on the UK charts—the highest ranking ever for an African album. Honestly, we're definitely here for all these boss moves.

READ: It Will Take More Than an 'Authentic African Sound' for South African Artists to Blow Up Globally

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Photo: Sundance Film Festival

South African Director Oliver Hermanus on Remaking a Classic

The award-winning director behind Skoonheid and Moffie tackles his first film set outside his home country -- a reworking of auteur Akira Kurosawa’s Ikiru -- which is premiering at this year's Sundance Film Festival.

In Living, Oliver Hermanus’ latest film, Bill Nighy takes on the role Takashi Shimura earned a BAFTA nomination for playing in the 1952 classic, Ikiru. Except Nighy's not Mr Watanabe, he’s Mr Williams, a British version of Shimura’s workaholic who finds out he only has a short time left to live. Revered auteur Akira Kurosawa’s film made its premiere at the Berlin International Film Festival in 1954, where it would go on to win him a special prize of the senate of Berlin, before garnering acclaim for many more years to come. So, too, is Hermanus' remaking of the story bowing at a film festival, and so far, it's also been earning the South African director high praise.

Born in Cape Town, Hermanus has steadily built his career on South African-centric stories. Whether it’s the portrait of a Mitchell’s Plain mother caught between poverty and violence in Shirley Adams or the experience of gay recruits conscripted into the army in Moffie, Hermanus’ films speak to various realms of South African life. Living is his first venture outside of South Africa – not just in storyline, but in cast and crew too. The screenplay is by Nobel and Booker Prize winner Kazuo Ishiguro (The Remains of The Day) and Hermanus was brought on as director by the producers.

From debuting his first film Shirley Adams in 2009 in competition at the 62nd Locarno Film Festival, followed by Skoonheid (Beauty) at the 64th Cannes Film Festival, and The Endless River at the 72nd Venice Film Festival, where it was the first South African film to be invited to the main competition, to his fourth feature, Moffie at the 76th Venice Film Festival in 2019, Hermanus has cemented his reputation as a filmmaker to watch.

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AFCON Stampede Leaves 8 Dead, 40+ Injured In Cameroonian Stadium

The unfortunate event took place Monday, ahead of the host country Cameroon's match against Comoros.