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Burna Boy 'Twice as Tall' album cover.

Here Are All the Samples In Burna Boy's 'Twice As Tall'

Sample Chief breaks down all of the samples on Twice As Tall, from Naughty by Nature's "Jamboree" to Sade's "Sweetest Taboo" and many others.

Following his Grammy- nominated African Giant album which dropped last year, Burna Boy's latest body of work Twice As Tall released on August 14. Executive produced by American rapper and record producer Diddy, the album has been making heavy waves.

Since its release, Twice As Tall has received glowing praise for its political consciousness, introspection, gut-wrenching honesty and fascinating experimentation with sounds, some originally devised and others sampled from Burna's musical influences.

If you found the collaborations impressive, wait till you get into the samples and influences that made the album such a solid piece of work.


Read: Sample Chief, a Go-To Platform for African Music, Share 5 of their Favorite Samples

And to help break down these samples is the Sample Chief on Twitter. From Naughty by Nature's "Jamboree," to Pat Boone's "Twice As Tall," Rayan T's "Nothing Dey Par," Sade's "Sweetest Taboo," Marc Anthony's "I Need You" and many others.

Burna Boy has grown to be masterful with his samples, giving them a refreshing twist that matches his upbeat sound.

Check out Sample Chief's video breakdown below and keep up with them for more wholesome Afrobeats content.

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Photo by Olukayode Jaiyeola/NurPhoto via Getty Images.

How Davido's 'FEM' Became the Unlikely #EndSARS Protest Anthem

When Nigerian youth shout the line "Why everybody come dey para, para, para, para for me" at protests, it is an act of collective rebellion and rage, giving flight to our anger against the police officers that profile young people, the bureaucracy that enables them, and a government that appears lethargic.

Some songs demand widespread attention from the first moments they unfurl themselves on the world. Such music are the type to jerk at people's reserves, wearing down defenses with an omnipresent footprint at all the places where music can be shared and enjoyed, in private or in communion; doubly so in the middle of an uncommonly hot year and the forced distancing of an aggressive pandemic that has altered the dynamics of living itself. Davido's "FEM" has never pretended to not be this sort of song. From the first day of its release, it has reveled in its existence as the type of music to escape to when the overbearing isolation of lockdown presses too heavily. An exorcism of ennui, a sing-along, or a party starter, "FEM" was made to fit whatever you wanted it to be.

However, in the weeks since its release, the song has come to serve another purpose altogether. As young Nigerians have poured out into the streets across the country to protest against the brutality of the Federal Special Anti-Robbery Squad, known as SARS, "FEM" has kept playing with the vigour of a generational protest anthem. From Lagos to Abia to Benin and Abuja, video clips have flooded the Internet of people singing word-for-word to Davido's summer jam as they engage in peaceful protests. In one video, recorded at Alausa, outside the Lagos State Government House, youths break into an impromptu rendition of the song when the governor of the state, Babajide Sanwo-Olu, tried addressing them; chants of "O boy you don dey talk too much" rent through the air, serving as proof of their dissatisfaction with his response to their demands—and the extortionist status quo.

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