Music
Photo: Bolaji Odukoya

Ice Prince.

The 7 Best Nigerian Songs of the Month (March)

Featuring Burna Boy, Ice Prince x Oxlade, Teni, DJ Tunez and more.

Here are the best, and most noteworthy, Nigerian tracks we had on repeat this month.

Follow our NAIJA HITS playlist on Spotify here and Apple Music here.


Ice Prince 'KOLO' feat. Oxlade

Ice Prince comes through with "Kolo," his new Edgar Boi-produced single featuring Oxlade. The alluring track follows Ice Prince rapping about a love that makes you go mad over afro-fusion beat work. "I'm talking about a girl that I fell in love with and I'm going crazy thinking about," he explains. "I can't stop thinking about her and getting her the best things in life, and how I want to make her my wife."

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Burna Boy '23'

Burna Boy has recently released the music video for "23" which features on his fifth studio album Twice As Tall which was released in August of last year. The music video is the second set of visuals shared by the Nigerian artist following "Onyeka" which dropped last month. Directed by Clarence Peters and produced by Skread, the music video makes a number of references to the legendary basketball player, Michael Jordan, while aptly celebrating diverse women at a time when Women's Month has just kicked off in the US.

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Peruzzi 'Somebody Baby' feat. Davido

Nigerian singer and songwriter, Peruzzi, has finally shared the visuals for his latest single "Somebody Baby" featuring Davido. The "Somebody Baby" music video comes ahead of Peruzzi's long-awaited album Rum & Boogie. The album reportedly features Tiwa Savage, Fireboy DML, Phyno, Patoranking, Don Jazzy and more.

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Teni 'WONDALAND' LP 

Buzzing Nigerian Teni the Entertainer has released her anticipated debut album WONDALAND via Platoon. The album follows a recent collaboration with Davido on the single "For You," which was an international success, and currently the number 1 song in Nigeria. This album, which was made across 7 cities, London, New York, Dubai, Orlando, Ondo, Lagos, and Abuja, in a span of two years, is a testament to Teni's dedication and attempt to reach new artistic heights.

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DJ Tunez x J. Anthoni 'Bomb'

Nigerian producer and Wizkid DJ Tunez comes through with the new 7-track EP, All You Need, which sees him connecting with the up-and-coming J. Anthoni. The standout here is lead single "Bomb," which showcases a pop-tint on this afro-dancehall fusion project. Get into the whole thing above.

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Yemi Alade features on Angelique Kidjo's 'Dignity'

Grammy award-winning singer, Angélique Kidjo, has released the stunning music video for "Dignity" featuring Yemi Alade. The song is an homage to the protestors of the #EndSARS movement last year—Nigeria's call to an end to police brutality. Kidjo and Alade have come together a year later after successfully collaborating on Alade's "Shekere". The "Dignity" music video is cinematic storytelling fitting for the message behind the song.

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Adekunle Gold, Patoranking 'Pretty Girl'

Adekunle Gold has recently shared the visuals for his "Pretty Girl" collaboration with fellow Nigerian artist, Patoranking. The track features on his 10-track Afro Pop, Vol.1 album which dropped last year. The new music video, which was directed by Olu The Wave, is a fun and vibrant conceptualisation of the song's energy and central message about a pretty girl who's admittedly put them under a spell.

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Follow our NAIJA HITS playlist on Spotify here and Apple Music here.


Music
Photo by Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Hugh Masekela's New York City Legacy

A look back at the South African legend's time in New York City and his enduring presence in the Big Apple.

In Questlove's magnificent documentary, Summer of Soul, he captures a forgotten part of Black American music history. But in telling the tale of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, the longtime musician and first-time filmmaker also captures a part of lost South African music history too.

Among the line-up of blossoming all-stars who played the Harlem festival, from a 19-year-old Stevie Wonder to a transcendent Mavis Staples, was a young Hugh Masekela. 30 years old at the time, he was riding the wave of success that came from releasing Grazing in the Grass the year before. To watch Masekela in that moment on that stage is to see him at the height of his time in New York City — a firecracker musician who entertained his audiences as much as he educated them about the political situation in his home country of South Africa.

The legacy Masekela sowed in New York City during the 1960s remains in the walls of the venues where he played, and in the dust of those that are no longer standing. It's in the records he made in studios and jazz clubs, and on the Manhattan streets where he once posed with a giant stuffed zebra for an album cover. It's a legacy that still lives on in tangible form, too, in the Hugh Masekela Heritage Scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music.

The school is the place where Masekela received his education and met some of the people that would go on to be life-long bandmates and friends, from Larry Willis (who, as the story goes, Masekela convinced to give up opera for piano) to Morris Goldberg, Herbie Hancock and Stewart Levine, "his brother and musical compadre," as Mabusha Masekela, Bra Hugh's nephew says.

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