Audio
Sho Madjozi "John Cena"

The 19 Songs You Need to Hear This Week

Featuring Sho Madjozi, Odunsi, Sarkodie, Mr Eazi, Fuse ODG, Santi and more.

Every week, we highlight the cream of the crop in music through our Best Music of the Week column.

Here's our round up of the best tracks and music videos that came across our desks, which you can also check out in our Songs You Need to Hear This Week playlists on Spotify and Apple Music.

Follow our SONGS YOU NEED TO HEAR THIS WEEK playlist on Spotify here and Apple Music here.

Check out all of OkayAfrica's new playlists on Spotify and Apple Music.


Sho Madjozi 'John Cena'

South African hip-hop/pop artist Sho Madjozi stopped by the A COLORS SHOW studios in Berlin, Germany. In front of a turquoise backdrop, the artist performed her new song "John Cena." She slid through the performance with the customary vigor that is now synonymous to the artist. Obeying the gqom beat's orders, Madjozi gyrated, showing off her personality and light footedness (she even did the infamous vosho dance).

Find out more

Odunsi 'Wetin Dey/ Better Days' Ft. WANI

Odunsi (The Engine) comes through with the music video for "Better Days" and "Wetin Dey.""Better Days" is a hazy production helmed by P2J. The guitar-flanked track features vocals from singer-songwriter WANI, who we've previously covered. The hip-hop-leaning "Wetin Dey" samples a classic tune from Nigerian underground rap pioneers Ruff Rugged & Raw, which was also titled "Wetin Dey (Omukeke)."

Find out more

Jorja Smith 'Be Honest' feat. Burna Boy

Burna Boy links up with British singer Jorja Smith once again, for her new single "Be Honest," the first since the release of her memorable debut album Lost & Found. The sultry, afropop-inspired track sees Smith singing cheekily about a lover atop rhythmic production. On "Be Honest," the artist is experimenting with a more upbeat and percussion-heavy sound. Burna Boy joins in on the song's third verse, offering his Pidgin and Patios-tinged flow.

Find out more

Fuse ODG 'Cool Down' ft. Olamide, Joey B, Kwamz & Flava

Popular Ghanaian MC artist Fuse ODG is back with a new music video for his collaborative record "Cool Down." The track features several rappers including Olamide, Flava, Joey B and Kwamz—who all take turns to deliver their own freestyles atop the song's salsa-inspired production. For the music video, the artist took a creative approach, launching the #SelfieCypherChallenge, using vertical, self-recorded clips of each artist living their best lives as they perform their verses.

Find out more

YoungstaCPT 'Old Kaapie'

YoungstaCPT has just released yet another single off of his debut album 3T. "Old Kaapie," produced by the super producer trio Ganja Beats, has just been treated to visuals to highlight it. "Old Kaapie" sends a message of encouragement to Coloured people to shed off the stereotypes placed on them by society, and take over the world. As YoungstaCPT raps on the first verse: "This is something that you need to hear aloud/ Brown mense, the world is ours/ But those in power never will allow"

Find out more

Sarkodie 'Do You' ft. Mr Eazi

Ghanaian heavyweight Sarkodie teams up with Mr Eazi on this new single "Do You." This is the third single in his upcoming album campaign due later in the year.

Santi 'Raw Dinner' (The Movie) feat Kida Kudz

Santi has taken his already memorable music video offerings to another level, releasing a short film as the music video for his latest single 'Raw Dinner," featuring Kida Kudz from his debut album Mandy and the Jungle. Constantly drawing inspiration from the Nollywood horror films of the '90s—which he also referenced heavily in the video for last year's "Freaky"—the artist produced an 8-minute short with dark and stunning imagery.

Find out more

Swae Lee 'Won't Be Late' ft. Drake, Produced by Tekno

Rae Sremmurd's Swae Lee drops two new singles today, "Won't Be Late" featuring Drake and "Sextasy." "Won't Be Late" is notably produced by Nigeria's own Tekno. The new single is built on a mid tempo, afro-fusion-inspired beat, filled with claps, and light keyboard chords. As well as production, Tekno also gets a writing credit on the new song. You can hear his input when Drake sings lines like, 'Ikebe, pressing on me heavy' and 'Bakasi, moving on me wassy.'

Find out more

Lazarus 'Moyo Wanga'

Lazarus is a rising artist from Malawi who's fighting for social change for people with albinism in his country, and across Africa. He just released his debut album, Stomp On The Devil, which blends traditional Malawian styles with modern folk, all shaped by Lazarus' past as a street musician. The new music video for "Moyo Wanga" released alongside Extinction Rebellion. The video, directed by Johan Hugo, follows Lazarus as he performs at home in Malawi, as well as across New York City, through rotoscoped footage.

Find out more

Nonso Amadi 'Go Outside' ft. Mr Eazi

Nonso Amadi is a Toronto-based musician cooking up his own blend of afro-fusion by mixing influences from his Nigerian background with elements of RnB, soul, pop and much more. The 23-year-old artist just dropped his latest release, Free, a 6-song EP which features appearances from Mr Eazi on the memorable lead single "Go Outside."

Find out more

Tems 'Try Me'

Rising Nigerian artist Tems shares the visuals for her addictive new single, "Try Me," The new video, directed by Demola Falomo and produced by Ladder, Lex and Booker, tells a story of a band of misfits held against their will for being different to the norm.

DJ Jimmy Jatt ft. Mr. Eazi & Skales 'Halima'

Mr Eazi, Skales and pioneering Nigerian DJ Jimmy Jatt have linked up for a new track to close out the summer. "Halima" opens with Mr Eazi delivering passionately sung lyrics about the woman of his dreams. He also provide's the song's catchy chorus. Fellow Nigerian artist Skales joins in on the second verse, matching Mr Eazi's passionate energy for his lover. The track was produced by none other that Guilty Beatz.

Find out more

Amadou & Mariam + The Blind Boys of Alabama 'Bamako to Birmingham'

Malian duo Amadou & Mariam collaborate with the Grammy-winning Blind Boys of Alabama on two new singles "Bamako To Birmingham" and "Two Cultures, One Beat."

Yemi Alade 'Home' & 'Give Dem'

Yemi Alade is readying the release of her forthcoming studio album Woman of Steel. Ahead of that, the Nigerian star has shared to new singles, "Home" and "Give Dem," as well as cover art and tracklist. "Home" is the album's opening track, which features fuji-inspired production by Vtek. The song sees her her delivering strong vocals as she sings about being "at home" with her lover. "Give Dem," is a more upbeat offering, produced by Krizbeatz that sees the artist sharing swaggering lines atop a fiery, danceable beat.

Find out more

Ras Nebyu 'Days Later'

Ethiopian-American Ras Nebyu, a member of the Washington Slizzards collective, drops his latest visual for "Days Later" from his Uptown Lion Walkin LP. The new music video was shot throughout various parts of Ethiopia.

Priddy Ugly & Bontle Modiselle 'Bonita'

Priddy Ugly and Bontle Modiselle, known collectively as Rick Jade, made an announcement of their pregnancy today. The couple has been together for a decade, too. To make their anniversary celebration and pregnancy announcement even more special, the duo released a video for a new single titled "Bonita." The video was shot in an art gallery by Priddy Ugly's regular video director, Nkululeko Lebambo aka Armsdeal (of CideFX Films).

Find out more

K.O & Nandi Madida 'Say U Will'

K.O and Nandi Madida follow-up their 2014 smash hit "Skhanda Love" with "Say U Will." The song features Nandi's spacious vocals and K.O's swaggering rhymes, just like the previous one. "Say U Will" is a song about lovers surrendering and promising to be there for each other.

Find out more

Stiff Pap 'NNNEWWW'

Stiff Pap is a duo from Cape Town consisting of the producer Jakinda and the rapper Ayema Problem. With their latest EP titled Stiff Pap Radio, the group take a leap forward. Their debut EP Based on a Qho Story, was lean in nature owing to the overt gqom influence on the project. On Stiff Pap Radio, however, Jakinda intensifies their production and Ayema Problem's writing goes further than the fun raps.

Find out more

Just G, Ranks ATM, Sims '3 Way'

If you've been following the ATM (African Trap Movement) gang closely, then you know a joint project from three of its members—Just G, Ranks ATM and Sims—has been a long time in the making. 3 Way is a 10-track mixtape consisting of songs performed by the trio collectively, including the lead single "M.I.A," which has been out for a few months. The only guests on the project are two of ATM's founding members Emtee and Saudi, who appear on the songs "Where Would I Be" and "Silent Night."

Find out more

Follow our SONGS YOU NEED TO HEAR THIS WEEK playlist on Spotify here and Apple Music here.




popular
Photo: JM Films.

The 13 Songs You Need to Hear This Week

Featuring Tiwa Savage, Black Coffee x Usher, Reekado Banks, Bas, Burna Boy and more.

Every week, we highlight the cream of the crop in music through our Best Music of the Week column.

Here's our round up of the best tracks and music videos that came across our desks, which you can also check out in our Songs You Need to Hear This Week playlists on Spotify and Apple Music.

Follow our SONGS YOU NEED TO HEAR THIS WEEK playlist on Spotify here and Apple Music here.

Check out all of OkayAfrica's new playlists on Spotify and Apple Music.

Keep reading... Show less
Audio
Asa "Good Thing" (Youtube)

The 10 Songs You Need to Hear This Week

Featuring Asa, Samthing Soweto, Sudan Archives, Mut4y x Maleek Berry, Adekunle Gold and more

Every week, we highlight the cream of the crop in music through our Best Music of the Week column.

Here's our round up of the best tracks and music videos that came across our desks, which you can also check out in our Songs You Need to Hear This Week playlists on Spotify and Apple Music.

Follow our SONGS YOU NEED TO HEAR THIS WEEK playlist on Spotify here and Apple Music here.

Check out all of OkayAfrica's new playlists on Spotify and Apple Music.

Keep reading... Show less
Audio
Darkovibes

The 12 Songs You Need to Hear This Week

Featuring Sarkodie, Cassper Nyovest, Elaine, Darkovibes, Stogie T, Phyno, C Natty, and more.

Every week, we highlight the cream of the crop in music through our best music of the week column.

Here's our round up of the best tracks and music videos that came across our desks, which you can also check out in our Songs You Need to Hear This Week playlists on Spotify and Apple Music.

Follow our SONGS YOU NEED TO HEAR THIS WEEK playlist on Spotify here and Apple Music here.

Check out all of OkayAfrica's playlists on Spotify and Apple Music.

Keep reading... Show less
popular
Photo courtesy of CNOA

These Colombian Civil Rights Activists Are Fighting to Make Sure Afro-Colombians are Counted in the Census

When 30 percent of Colombia's Black citizens disappeared from the data overnight, a group of Afro-Colombian activists demanded an explanation.

It was the end of 2019 when various Black organizations protested in front of the census bureau—The National Institute of Statistics and Informatics (DANE)—in Bogotá, Colombia to show their dissatisfaction about what they called a "statistical genocide" of the black population. The census data, published that year, showed 2.9 million people, only 6 percent of the total population of the country, was counted as "Afro-Colombian," "Raizal," and "Palenquero"—the various terms identifying black Colombians.

For many years, Afro-Colombians have been considered the second largest ethno-racial group in the country. Regionally, Colombia has long been considered the country with the second highest number of Afro-descendants after Brazil, according to a civil society report.

Why did the population of Afro-Colombians drop so drastically?

Afro-Colombian, Black, Raizal, and Palenquero civil-rights activists protesting erasure of Afro-descendants in front of the census bureau.

Last year, a crowd of activists gathered in Bogota to protest what they saw as erasure of Black communities in the Colombian census.

Photo courtesy of CNOA

In the latest national census report from 2018/2019, there appeared to be a 30.8 percent reduction of the overall group of people that identified as Black, Afro-Colombian, Raizal, and Palenquero, as compared to the 2005. After this controversial report, an Afro-Colombian civil rights organization known as the National Conference of Afro Colombian Organizations (CNOA), officially urged DANE to explain the big undercounting of the black population.

This wasn't a small fight. Representatives who hold the special seats of Afro-Colombians in Colombia's congress asked the census bureau to attend a political control debate at the House of Representatives in November 2019 to deliver an accountability report. "The main goal of doing a political debate was to demand DANE to give us a strong reason about the mistaken data in the last census in regard to the Afro population," said Ariel Palacios, an activist and a member of CNOA.

At the debate, the state released an updated census data report saying that, almost 10 percent of the Colombian population—4.6 million people out of 50.3 million—considers themselves Afro-Colombians or other ethnicities (like Raizal, and Palenquero). But despite DANE trying to confirm the accuracy and reliability on the latest census report it was clear that, for a variety of reasons, Black people were missed by the census. The state argued that their main obstacles with data collection were related to the difficulties of the self-recognition question, as well as security reasons that didn't allow them to access certain regions. They also admitted to a lack of training, logistics and an overall lack of success in the way the data collectors conducted the census.

How could they have counted Black populations better?

Afro-Colombian, Black, Raizal, and Palenquero civil-rights activists playing drums in front of the census bureau.

Drummers performing during a protest against the Colombian census bureau's erasure of Afro-Colombians from the 2018 census.

Photo courtesy of CNOA

These arguments were not reasonable for the civil rights activists, partially because the state failed to properly partner with Afro-organizations like CNOA to conduct or facilitate extensive informational campaigns about the self-identification questions.

"CNOA has worked on self-recognition and visibility campaigns among the Afro community and this census ignored our work," says priest Emigdio Cuesta-Pino, the executive secretary of CNOA. Palacios also thinks that the majority of Afro-Colombians are aware of their identity "we self-identify because we know there is a public political debate and we know that there is a lack of investment on public policies."

That's why it is not enough to leave the statistical data to the official census bureau to ensure that Afro-Colombian communities are fully counted in the country. And the civil rights activists knows that. They made a big splash in the national media and achieved visibility in the international community.

Thanks to The Washington Office on Latin America (WOLA), a human rights organization, Palacios traveled to D.C to meet with Race and Equality institution and a Democratic Congressman. "We called for a meeting with representative Hank Johnson to talk about the implementation of Colombia's peace accords from an Afro-Colombian perspective but also to address the gross undercounts of its black population," says Palacios.

For the activists at CNOA, the statistical visibility of the Black population is one of their battles. They have fought for Afro population recognition for almost two decades. "Since the very beginning CNOA has worked on the census issue as one of our main commitments within the statistical visibility of the Afro-Colombian people," says priest Cuesta-Pina. Behind this civil organization are 270 local associations, who work for their rights and collective interests.

The activists want to raise awareness on identity. Because according to Palacios, "In Colombia, there is missing an identity debate—we don't know what we are. They [the census bureau] ask if we are black, or if we are Afro-Colombians. But what are the others being asked? If they are white, mestizo or indigenous?" Palacios believes that for "CNOA this debate is pending, and also it is relevant to know which is the character of this nation."

Afro-Colombian Populations and the Coronavirus

Afro-Colombian, Black, Raizal, and Palenquero civil-rights activists use mock coffins and statistics to protest erasure of Afro-descendants

Colombian civil-rights activist insist that undercounting Afro-descendants can have a real impact on the health of Afro-Colombian communities, especially during the COVID-19 coronavirus crisis.

Photo courtesy of CNOA

Even though the state recently "agreed with to give us a detailed census report" and make a different projection with the micro data, says Palacios, now with the Covid-19 emergency, CNOA and the government has suspended all meetings with them, including cancelling a second congressional debate and the expert round table meeting to analyze the data.

Unfortunately, it is exactly in situations like the Covid-19 emergency where data analysis and an accurate census report would have been useful. According to the professor and PhD in Sociology Edgar Benítez from Center for Afro Diasporic Studies—CEAF, "Now it is required to provide a reliable and timely information on how the contagion pattern will spread in those predominantly Afro regions in the country and what is the institutional capacity in those places to face it," says Benítez.

He adds that this information is "critical at the moment because the institutional capacity is not up to provide it at the current situation". That's why the Center for Afro Diasporic Studies plans to work with DANE information from the last census. According to Benítez, "We are thinking of making comparisons at the municipal level with the information reported in the 2018 Quality of Life Survey, in order to have a robust and extensive database as possible on the demographic, economic and social conditions of the black, afro, Raizal and Palenquera population in Colombia."









get okayafrica in your inbox

news.

popular.